Disabled need more job opportunities

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I’m the proud sister of an individual with disabilities who has benefited from New York state’s commitment to creating employment for all of its citizens to reach their full potential.My brother, Paul, works at Schenectady ARC’s PineRidge Industries center in Scotia. Some days, he works at light industry tasks. Other days, he goes out into the community through the agency’s integrated shredding business, removing bins of highly sensitive documents for secure destruction.Many of these customers are government agencies that enter into contracts through New York State’s Preferred Source Program in conjunction with a not-for-profit business known as NYSID (New York State Industries for the Disabled, Inc.). This creates meaningful employment for people like Paul, who is one of 7,000 employed on NYSID contracts throughout the state. Paul was recognized for his job at PineRidge Industries at NYSID’s annual business event and awards program in September 2017. I was thrilled to watch him deliver a speech and say “I love my job.” Paul manages his own finances and lives as independently as possible in the community where he grew up. Everyone knows him as “the mayor” of Schenectady.Not all individuals like Paul have the same opportunity to work in jobs they love. Workers with disabilities experience a 70 percent unemployment rate.I urge legislators to modernize aspects of the Preferred Source Law to create more employment opportunities than ever before.My brother’s future security, and that of a truly dedicated workforce of his peers, depends on it.Trish HarringtonSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Anderson starts, but Dodgers finish off NLCS winMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

Trump military parade is more insidious than a mere distraction

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionWASHINGTON — Military parades, “treasonous” opponents — do you sense a pattern here?President Trump is such a master of the politics of distraction that everything he says and does is assumed to be a diversion from something more important, the Russia collusion issue above all. It’s certainly true that in Trump’s exotic circus of scandal and outrage, many stories that would have engulfed earlier administrations roll right off the back of the news cycle. Here’s hoping that instead, a Marine who knows what genuine battlefield heroism entails will find a way to sideline this very bad idea.He might persuade Trump to contain his self-indulgence and spend the money a parade would cost on scholarships for the children of wounded warriors and those who have died in battle, or to help homeless vets.This is what real patriotism looks like.Dwight D. Eisenhower, the last great general to serve as president, urged “an alert and knowledgeable citizenry” to mesh the “huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.” ]Trump’s parade is the antithesis of Ike’s prudence and his commitment to safeguarding our democracy. E.J. Dionne is a nationally syndicated columnist with The Washington Post.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists It comes within days of Trump’s charge that Democrats who did not stand and cheer him during his State of the Union address could be guilty of “treason.”When a leader who often praises strongmen abroad defines routine political opposition as disloyalty to country and then suggests hauling out the military to march in our streets as he looks down from on high, friends of freedom should take notice.Those who challenge the portrayals of Trump as an authoritarian or an autocrat because our freedoms are still intact miss the point.In enduring democracies such as ours, liberty is eroded slowly by politicians who undermine the norms and practices that protect it.There is good reason why we have not made military parades a standard part of our patriotic repertoire. Trump said he got this idea from France, our democratic ally whose Bastille Day military procession goes back 138 years.This gives him cover because spectacles of the sort Trump has in mind are associated less with free nations than with dictatorships in Russia, North Korea, China, and the totalitarian regimes of the 1930s. Consider, for starters, his profiting while president from his resorts and golf clubs, his alleged payoff of a porn star, and the resignation of the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over conflicts of interest.On the substance of policy, he can govern largely by stealth.Discussion of the decisions his administration has made on a range of regulatory, environmental, labor, health care and tax matters gets pushed to the bottom of the public agenda.It will thus be tempting to dismiss Trump’s desire to have a big military parade as yet another ploy to change the subject.Trump knows perfectly well that many liberals are uneasy with massive demonstrations of military strength, so some who might raise their voices in dissent could draw back out of fear that he is baiting them and that they’ll play into his hands.Trump clearly longs to be the lead figure on the reviewing stand gazing out on the tanks and missiles as a tribute to his own power, while casting his critics as unpatriotic foes of our men and women in uniform. But this is precisely why his parade proposal should be treated as dangerous and not simply another bout of Trumpian ego enhancement. The United States, born in republican opposition to royalist rule, has been properly reticent about flaunting our formidable arsenal, typically limiting such displays to celebrations of war victories.This is in keeping with a tradition that regularly honors those who sacrifice to defend our country, but resolutely limits the political role of the armed forces.There is also an element of pragmatism in our shunning of martial ostentatiousness.Our military is, as Defense Secretary James Mattis has said, “the world’s most feared and trusted force.” There is no need to prove this with a pageant of might that is at least as likely to inspire resentment as respect — especially since it is now inevitable that even our friends abroad would see Trumpian excess in this break with our past, as Rick Noack noted in The Washington Post.Mattis has done better than most Trump appointees in avoiding complicity with the president’s worst abuses.Perhaps Mattis has decided to preserve his influence by humoring Trump’s parade envy.last_img read more

Attend meeting on going green March 28

first_imgAre you a NYSEG or National Grid customer in the Capital Region who has considered making a switch to green, sustainable energy for your home, property, or business? Did you know that you can not only install solar panels on your home or business property, and buy or lease solar panels at a community farm, but you can also choose a green supplier for your electric bill?Now is a great time to explore the many options available. Community Advocates for Sustainable Energy (CASE), an affiliate of SNYFGP (stopnypipeline.org), will offer a free presentation and panel discussion with area solar companies on the opportunities for onsite and off-site (community) solar in our area.The event will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 28, at the First United Methodist Church, 1 Gilligan Road, East Greenbush. Contact Becky Meier at: beckyjmeier@gmail.com or call: 518-781-4686.SUZANNE POLLARDNassauMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Protests a great way to show outrage

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThe March 12 letter with regard to the country’s gun problem posits that age and guns aren’t the problem. I’d suggest that age is one of many factors that should be explored to improve public safety relative to the use of firearms. Public policy often struggles to keep up with scientific findings — in this case (and others) with what research tells us about brain development. There’s a growing body of evidence that points to full maturation of the human brain well into our 20s. Less mature adolescent brains are prone to increased risk-taking, novelty seeking, lack of impulse control and influence by peers.By all means we need to do more and much better in order to address mental health, which is already at a crisis level. But the suggestion that gun laws wouldn’t deter someone with a mental health problem from obtaining a firearm, or an assault-type weapon like the AR-15, is defeatist. Screenings by qualified medical and mental health professionals as requirements to obtain a license to purchase a firearm would be prudent measures to decrease the likelihood of the frequent tragic consequences of easy access to guns. Such a screening might be periodically required to recertify gun licenses, as debilitating health and mental health problems may emerge at any point in our lives.No matter how we feel about it — and much of the debate is being driven by emotion right now — there’s strong evidence that we will all be safer by taking reasonable precautions, as have other countries quite successfully. Gun violence is a public safety issue that must be dealt with, just as we have put in place sensible measures for automobile safety, disease control, pharmaceuticals, smoking tobacco or using alcohol.Cooler heads must prevail and special interests sidelined, or we will continue to see people and children tragically injured, maimed and killed, and fear and anxiety rule our lives.Robert CarreauWatervlietMore from The Daily Gazette:Puccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfectEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesNiskayuna girls’ cross country wins over Bethlehemlast_img read more

Trump, Obama have similar approaches

first_imgDonald Trump and Barack Obama: Both hype up their economy, ignoring or minimizing the many negatives.Both have failed to address climate change. Few consider Trump’s coal or Obama’s fracking as positive solutions to this problem.They each have a similar foreign policy, including giving aid to Saudi Arabia, which many blame on Yemen’s humanitarian crisis.Both give very optimistic but questionable predictions about resources: Trump’s 1,000 years of coal claim and Obama’s 100 years of natural gas claim. I’d say at this point Trump has more in common with Obama than with the usual comparison (Hitler).Colin YunickCharltonMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsPolice: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the… Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Thursday, Jan. 9

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionUnwanted gifts can hurt environmentDid you know that many perfectly good returned online products are actually sent directly to landfills instead of being repackaged for sale?Due to the ease of free online returns, we’re tempted to buy more than needed and then return the wrong sizes, etc.The problem is the companies then need to inspect the item for potential damage, and it’s cheaper to just throw the item away than foot the bill for inspecting the product.Did you spill on it? Did you wrinkle it? Is there hidden damage? It’s easier just to trash the item than to actually put it back on shelves.Reports in France and Germany, for example, show new items, including diapers, toys, washing machines, smartphones and furniture, are simply being destroyed.Some of the European countries are now working on banning the destruction of unsold goods.So what can we do? Be a smart consumer. Look at the company you’re supporting. How do they handle returned merchandise? Talk to them. Companies listen to their customers. Encourage them to donate and recycle returns.Some companies such as Best Buy, Dell, and REI actually sell refurbished and returned goods deeply discounted. Rethink how much you purchase. Do we need so much “stuff?” Donate or swap items instead of sending them back to the retailer. Items can find a way to a good home instead of a landfill this way.Caroline BrooksScotiaLove doesn’t justify assisting in murderIn response to Jill McGrath’s Dec. 26 letter (“Don’t discount love in assisted suicides”), my response is that her ex-husband would not qualify under the pending bill because he can no longer freely choose suicide. The legislation would have to be expanded to allow another person to request his suicide.For any person to request death for another is akin to contract murder, and the bill title should first be changed from physician-assisted suicide to physician-assisted murder.As a young child, I lived under a dictator who instigated the killing of millions of people in order to cure what he perceived to be societal ills. This must never, ever happen again. Yet, in New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s lauded abortion expansion act does exactly the same: one person can decide the killing of another innocent human life.Love of a terminally suffering person can never justify the act of killing him. The correct response is to provide care and pain-killing medicines to alleviate the pain.For heaven’s sake, we are talking about a human being here, not an injured horse being put down at the Saratoga Race Course.Wendell NeugebauerBallston SpaHonesty needed in recalling of historyKaren Cookson’s Dec. 29 essay raises the question of what making America great should look like. But I am afraid her praise of a pre-Colombian world doesn’t quite work.She describes a peaceful paradise where natives lived in harmony with nature. Nice, except any Comanche raider or warrior in the Aztec, Mayan or Inca empires would laugh at the idea of a peaceful world.Cookson asserts “once our world was at peace, rich and clean and we could ahead to a good life.” Well, no. Until a century ago, we could look forward to short, impoverished disease-filled lives with high infant mortality, famines and no way to deal with natural disasters. Living “in harmony with nature” largely means being at the mercy of nature.It helps to be honest about the past we want to recapture.David OchsePorter CornersMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Retail North-eastern promise

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

North Yorkshire retail: Stunted growth in York

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Leslau to launch new ‘riskier’ Investment

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

This is our worst nightmare

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img