Sevens World Series: England v Australia Olympics battle heats up

first_imgShould it come to that, they will be firm favourites. But England will be doing everything in their power to render Sandy Park an irrelevance this summer.To buy tickets for the Marriott London Sevens at Twickenham on 16-17 May, click here Aussie crunch: England’s Charlie Hayter is sent flying by Cameron Clark in Hong Kong (Pic: Getty Images) Squad stretchedEngland, who finished fourth in the series last year, are entitled to feel a little hard done by. After finishing third in Australia in October’s opening event, they suffered injuries to Hayter (hamstring), Dan Bibby (dislocated shoulder) and James Rodwell (ankle) in Dubai, reducing the squad to nine after the third game and having a knock-on effect on their performance in Port Elizabeth the following week.“Losing three players puts a big workload on the team,” says Burgess, the 26-year-old former Cornish Pirate. “Obviously we’re conditioned to play two tournaments back to back but it’s a cumulative effect. And our games always went to the wire so everyone was playing to the final whistle. Last year we had very few injuries.”To that misfortune can be added tight calls, with a harsh double whammy – a penalty try and Dan Norton yellow card – hurting their chances in a feisty HK Cup quarter-final with eventual champions Fiji.Even then, it took a great tackle by Savenaca Rawaca to deny Rodwell in the corner – watch it below – prior to a lot of shoving and verbals between the sides as the final whistle blew on a 14-12 Fiji win moments later. “I think England needed to win to keep them in with an Olympic chance,” said Fiji coach Ben Ryan, and though far from true, the pressure on England is mounting, not least because they also represent the hopes of Wales and Scotland, under the Great Britain flag.All to play forEngland did reach the final in Wellington but the bottom line is that only there and on the Gold Coast have they gleaned more points than Australia. Amor points out that England are “getting there”, that they are losing only by the slimmest of margins, but only three legs of the series remain, starting this weekend with Tokyo. John Brake, back from injury, replaces Worcester’s Richard de Carpentier as England prepare to face Hong Kong, Wales and Fiji in their pool.Whatever happens in the Far East, England will go to Glasgow and London next month with Rio qualification still in their grasp. In Mitchell, Rodwell, Bibby and Norton, they have the nucleus of a strong squad capable of achieving a first tournament win since Wellington 2013.But should the worse happen, they need only to look at a recent copy of the RFU’s in-house newspaper, Touchline, to see how to qualify through the back door. They will need to win the Grand PRIX 7s series, run by Rugby Europe and involving tournaments in Russia (6-7 June), Lyon (13-14 June) and Exeter (11-12 July). There is no dividing line drawn on the ‘standings’ table on the HSBC Sevens World Series website, but it’s as solid and real as the device on which you’re reading these words.The top four finishers in this season’s series can book their tickets to Rio 2016 as automatic qualifiers for the first Olympic rugby event since 1924. That means South Africa (110 points), Fiji (108) and New Zealand (107) are feeling pretty good about life as they look down on the chasing pack – of which Australia (84) and England (78) comfortably lead the way.This Anglo-Aussie tussle has become the story within the story, Olympic qualification being so glittering a prize that England’s players – already enjoying the services of a sports psychologist, Katie Warriner – are being advised by RFU ‘minders’ not even to discuss the consequences of failing to achieve a top-four finish.England’s Phil Burgess and Charlie Hayter were bang on message when we caught up with them at the Lensbury Club, the duo leaping about on crash mats and grasping at imaginary rugby balls in an outer space-themed photo shoot.“We are performance driven. If we get the performance right, the results will come,” says Hayter. Says Burgess: “Our focus is on the next game and the next tournament.”Learning curveNothing wrong with that – the ‘game by game’ response is a cliché for good reason – but are England running scared? The Aussies seem to have England’s number right now, their 12-7 Plate semi-final win in Hong Kong more convincing than the scoreline suggests because England captain Tom Mitchell’s try came after the full-time siren.Under Geraint John, Australia have become incredibly tough to breach, with South Africa only scraping through their HK Cup quarter-final 7-5, while the speed of ball at the breakdown area remains a concern for England despite having made strides in recent months. Tony Roques, renowned in his playing days for his abrasiveness in contact, joined the coaching team last autumn.“Tony came in as a defence and breakdown specialist and he’s added a lot to us,” says ex-Wasp Hayter, 26, one of the newest members of England’s centrally contracted core group.Phil’s errand: England’s Phil Burgess goes airborne for a photo shoot with sponsors Heathrow Express“From the stats, teams had targeted us in that (breakdown) area. South Africa, Fiji and New Zealand are world class in that area and it’s been a steep learning curve for us. But we’re competing really well, it’s just a matter of finding more consistency.”center_img England Sevens are losing ground in the race to secure a place for Team GB at Rio 2016. So this weekend’s event in Tokyo takes on added significance for Simon Amor’s men LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

A big year starts here – GB Wheelchair Rugby primed for Quad Nations

first_imgTickets for the Quad Nations, on 1-3 March, are not expensive. So if you want to get along this weekend, click here for tickets.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Fall guy: Jim Roberts, part of this week’s GB squad, takes a tumble in the 2016 Paralympics (OIS/IOC/AFP) GB Wheelchair Rugby go into this weekend’s Quad Nations in Leicester strengthened by two returning Paralympians, as their coach Paul Shaw tells Rugby World A big year starts here – GB Wheelchair Rugby primed for Quad NationsThis weekend sees the first of four major tournaments for Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby in 2019 – the King Power Quad Nations. Staged at Leicester’s Morningside Arena, the tournament brings together four of the world’s best teams – GB, Canada, France and world champions Japan – in an action-packed three-day scrap.GB open the tournament against Canada at 10.30am on Friday 1 March and the gold-medal match starts at 4pm on Sunday.“For people who haven’t seen the sport before, it will be a real eye-opener to see what Paralympic sport is all about,” says GB coach Paul Shaw.“We’ve got four teams who play very good, hard, intense rugby. It’s always exciting for any nation to host the world champions and we’ve got a very competitive GB team; we really expect to do well this weekend. We’ve beaten Japan in the last two years, and they’ve beaten us, so it’s about who turns up the day.“And I really enjoy the fact we get such great support from our friends and family within the rugby world. They come in good numbers to watch this competition.”Feel the Power: GB team members with Leicester City players at the tournament launch (Osborne&Hollis)The Quad Nations tournament was launched last year to provide a high-quality home-based competition for GB Wheelchair Rugby athletes. USA took gold a year ago, beating Australia 56-55 in the final, and while those nations occupy the top two places in the world rankings, there are plenty of sides chasing their tail.“The gap is getting closer, as last year’s World Championship in Sydney showed,” says Shaw, a three-time Paralympian. “The final between Japan and Australia was a one-point game, the semi-final between Australia and GB was a two-point game. France defeated Canada, who are No 4 in the world. With the top five teams, it’s one or two goals (difference) either way.”Down to the wire: the USA won last year’s inaugural Quad Nations event in Leicester (Osborne&Hollis)Shaw took over straight after London 2012 and has been steadily building depth. The GB squad for this weekend includes three survivors from those London Games in Jonathan Coggan, Aaron Phipps and Kylie Grimes – the latter two having returned to the fray in the past 12 or so months.“Aaron and Kylie both pursued other directions after London. Aaron went off and had a family, got his career underway, his public speaking. Kylie went on to do athletics and was at Rio in 2016. She competed in the Club throwing event (finishing fourth).“We approached Aaron to see if he would be interested in coming back. He’s decided to come back on board and has really excelled.“As for Kylie, we were looking at where we could get some extra marginal gains in our game and she opens up some new line-ups for us because of her (low) classification.”Phipps was 15 when he contracted meningitis and blood poisoning, and he lost his legs and most of his fingers due to septicaemia. In 2016 he summited Mount Kilimanjaro, spending the last four days of the ascent on his hands and knees because his off-road wheelchair could no longer cope with the rough terrain.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Star quality: GB’s Aaron Phipps, a 3.5 classification player, in action against USA at London 2012 (Getty)Grimes was 18 when she hit her head on the bottom of a swimming pool during a party in 2006. She was left paralysed from the chest down but like Phipps has gone on to play international sport and serve as an inspiration to many.Rarity value: Kylie Grimes is one of only two women competing in the Quad Nations (Jude Edginton)Grimes and Japan’s Kae Kurahashi are the only women involved in this weekend’s Quad Nations, but Saturday (6.15pm) sees an all-women demonstration match involving players from across the British leagues.“What we’ve done as a national game is encourage women to play the game,” says Shaw. “I think women really want to participate in the sport and the number of female players in the three divisions has definitely gone up.“And also from what I’ve seen in the youth programme, there’s a lot of young females playing the game and really enjoying it. Hopefully when they’re old enough they can come up into the senior ranks.”After the Quad Nations, GB compete in another four-team event in America in May, set to also feature USA, Japan and Australia.In August, GB defend the European Championship title they won two years ago in Germany. This time Denmark host the event and the top two qualify for next year’s Paralympics in Tokyo, so it’s the principal focus of GB this year.Then, in the wake of the inaugural Rugby Challenge tournament held in London during the 2015 World Cup, Japan will host a similar event for the world’s top eight teams during the 2019 World Cup. “Providing we get the result we want from the European Championship, it will be good preparation for us in Tokyo the following year,” adds Shaw.Rio grand: Japan in action during the 2016 Paralympics semi-final against Australia (Getty Images)A delegation from Japan will be in attendance this weekend as the Mayor of Kitakyushu and other dignitaries visit Leicester. The host city for the Wales team during this year’s World Cup, Kitakyushu has agreed to host the GB Wheelchair Rugby squad for the next two years.As part of this initiative, the city will provide support for the GB team during training camps ahead of the World Wheelchair Rugby Challenge, the Paralympic Test Event and the 2020 Paralympics. GBWR will support the city with civic engagements in schools and businesses, and will open their doors for citizens of the city to watch GB training sessions.The Mayor of Kitakyushu will enjoy a tour of Leicester before travelling to the Morningside Arena to watch the Japan v France Quad Nations match on Friday.The trophy for the Quad Nations champions has been named after Khun Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, the former Leicester City chairman who died in a helicopter crash last October. The Vichai Trophy will be awarded annually to each winner as a long-lasting tribute to the late chairman of King Power.last_img read more

Diocese of Vermont dedicates 35-panel solar installation

first_img Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Diocese of Vermont dedicates 35-panel solar installation Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Vermont Bishop Thomas Ely asks God’s blessing on the Rock Point School solar installation as the 35 panels rise from their horizontal “sleep” position and turn towards the morning sun. Photo/Anne Clarke Brown[Diocese of Vermont] As thirty-five solar panels turned into position behind him to face the morning sun, Bishop Thomas Ely, Bishop dedicated the new solar installation on the Diocese of Vermont’s property at Rock Point in Burlington, to the glory of God and “in thanksgiving for the goodness of all creation.”Environmentalist Bill McKibben, Congressman Peter Welch, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger were among the featured speakers at the celebration and formal dedication on April 30.A joint project of the diocese’s Rock Point Board of Governors and Rock Point School, the solar installation currently provides about 65 percent of the electricity that is used on the property on which the school and diocesan buildings are located. Planned efficiency measures will eventually increase that percentage.A third partner in the project is AllEarth Renewables, which constructed the 35 AllSun Trackers. By owning the installation for the first five years, AllEarth was able to take advantage of federal incentives not available to not-for-profit institutions. The diocese and Rock Point School will buy the power from AllEarth and after five years will purchase the system at fair market value, estimated to be 30 percent of the original cost of the equipment.Ely noted in his opening remarks that the project “stands as part of the promise of the Episcopal Church in Vermont and our affiliate Rock Point School to model for our churches and institutions a commitment to energy conservation, efficiency, and renewable energy projects. It offers a witness to others in our state and beyond of what is possible when we work together for a better tomorrow.”Other speakers echoed Ely’s emphasis on the importance of the project as a witness and example. Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin, in a letter read by former Rock Point Board Chair Charlie Roth, spoke about Vermonters leading the way “to a sustainable and secure energy future,” and he said, “The Episcopal Diocese’s solar project joins others around our state in demonstrating a commitment to the environment and to energy cost savings.”Vermont Congressman Peter Welch said, “People of faith do believe that spiritual values really matter” and added that such values need to be “anchored in a material world.” He said, “What has happened here with this work is that there has been an implementation of spiritual values in a material world. This project has created jobs. This project has reduced carbon emissions. It has created energy that we need for more jobs, and it has set an example that we hope will go viral and be duplicated all around this country. So I applaud the Diocese and the recognition of the unity between our spiritual aspirations and our material needs.”Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger noted that Burlington has not been in the forefront on renewable energy and said, “I hope to follow up on the challenge of the leadership you have shown and, as Congressman Welch said, attempt to build on this so that it has broader successes.”Burlington Electric Department General Manager Barbara Grimes said she was not surprised to see the Episcopal Church leading in this way and noted an important aspect for the “summer peaking utility” is that the installation will be most productive at the time when demands are highest.In addition to its witness to the wider community, the solar installation will serve as a valuable educational resource, both for the students at Rock Point School and for children of all ages from area schools who will be invited to visit and learn about solar energy. Rock Point Head of School C. J. Spirito told the crowd gathered for the celebration that collaboration is a vehicle for the school’s goals of offering “individualized opportunities for students to learn about themselves, to find their voice and to move forward in life in a meaningful way.”Rock Point science teacher Kathy Rossman and three senior students also spoke briefly about how the solar installation is being integrated into their learning. It has, said Rossman, “revolutionized the curriculum.” She added, “When students are able to not simply experience but also able to live their education, they are much more apt not only to remember it but also to make associations to other parts of the world they did not know they had connections with.”The day’s keynote speaker, environmentalist and 350.org founder Bill McKibben, said that when he looks at the solar panels, “I see the faces I’ve gotten to know around the world in my travels with 350.org,” people facing climate change problems that are not of their own making. “The problem of global warming is theoretical no more,” he said.McKibben described the upcoming “Connect the Dots” worldwide action planned for the weekend of May 5-6, and said, “Vermont after [Hurricane] Irene understands in a very visceral and powerful way what happens when you change the planet. That type of sadness calls for action, one type of which you see here today.”Noting that the planet has already passed the tipping point of 350 ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere (now at 393), he said, “It is our deep job now in very short order to keep things from getting worse. We can figure out how to do this if we set our minds to it.” Symbols are important, he said. “We have a beautiful new symbol that shows the commitment of this diocese to getting things done.”Ely concluded the formal dedication with a benediction and invited those present to tour the installation and enjoy refreshments provided by both Rock Point School and Jerry Greenfield, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s, who scooped ice cream.— Anne Clarke Brown is communication minister for the Episcopal Diocese of Vermont. Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Environment & Climate Change Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Anne Clarke BrownPosted May 4, 2012 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Task force for church structural reform issues statement

first_img Bishop Andrew Gerales Gentry says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Rector Albany, NY Jim Frodge says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET February 19, 2013 at 9:11 am Totally correct! This is not quite what the media would find useful — yet. Accredited to 10 General Conventions and 2 Lambeths, this sounds as if it might be Super Indaba — simply REACT and let the experts do the work. Disappointing. Rev. Dr. John Conrad says: Comments (9) February 18, 2013 at 8:15 pm This says nothing more than there was a meeting…in three languages. Another meeting.Lord, have mercy!JC+ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 February 18, 2013 at 4:55 pm We have a great opportunity to be nimble in the 21st century. New opportunities deserve better than the structures of the past that now can be counter productive. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Allen Hinman says: February 19, 2013 at 3:58 am what wonderful news. I would like to share my 55 years of insights, thoughts about a way forward and what the children need to grow in love and dedication to a futrue church worthy of participation. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET February 19, 2013 at 7:53 pm This simply reports that a committee met and a meeting was held. Nothing new and so typically Episcopalian as one writer has noted “The Episcopal Church continues to debate itself into irrelevancy”. Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Episcopal Church task force for church structural reform has issued a statement following the group’s inaugural meeting Feb. 14-16.The following is the statement in English and French below. The Spanish version is here.At the 77th General Convention, the Holy Spirit called The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself and how it can more deeply live into its identity in our rapidly changing world. The church responded to this call by unanimously adopting Resolution C095 in both houses, which created and commissioned this task force. On February 14, the appointed task force enthusiastically convened to begin our work. In our three days of discussion, prayer, and worship together, we have been energized by the diversity of talents, cultures, and life experiences present at the table, and we have been inspired by our shared love for the church and our passion for the creative work before us.We organized ourselves for business, agreeing on a leadership team consisting of two conveners, Dr. Catherine George and the Rev. Canon Craig Loya, and four initial working group leaders, Julia Ayala Harris, Margaret Shannon, the Rev. Leng Lim, and the Rev. Joseph Chambers. A secretary and two chaplains will be appointed prior to our next gathering. At this first meeting, we were also joined by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Jennings, and Executive Officer of General Convention the Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe, who offered us their valuable insights and made us aware of resources that will assist us in our work.We have started the process of developing an engagement strategy that will enable us to live into our commitment to transparency while preserving the sanctity of holy conversation. We further aim not only to provide a window into our work, but to provoke a parallel process of dialogue around questions of identity, structure, and culture at all levels of the church. To facilitate that discernment, we plan to offer a range of opportunities to obtain input and feedback from all corners of the church, and we urge all members to reflect prayerfully alongside us and to offer their insights and wisdom. These opportunities will be unveiled in the coming weeks.Drawing on language from Resolution C095, we have chosen to call ourselves the Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church: structures, governance, and administration (TREC). We hope that this conveys a sense of our work’s scope, as well as our desire to take a journey with the whole church as we discover how we are being called to be the body of Christ in the world.May the Holy Spirit continue to bless and guide the church through this time of change and new life.Lors la 77e Convention générale, le Saint-Esprit a appelé à l’Eglise Episcopale de se ré-imaginer et [penser] comment elle peut vivre plus profondément dans son identité dans notre monde de changements rapides. L’église a répondu à cet appel par l’adoption unanime de la Résolution C095 dans chaque chambre, qui a créé et commandé ce groupe de travail. Au 14 février, le groupe de travail nommé s’est réuni avec enthousiasme afin de commencer notre travail. Pendant nos trois journées de discussion, de prière, et de culte ensemble, nous avons été stimulés par la diversité de dons, de cultures, et d’experiences de vie présente à la table et nous avons été inspirés par notre amour partagé pour l’église et notre passion pour le travail créatif qui nous fait face.Nous nous sommes organisés pour le travail, nous nous sommes mis d’accord sur une structure de direction composée de deux organisateurs (Dr Katherine George et le Révérend Canon Craig Loya), quatre chefs de groupe de travail (Mme Julia Ayala Hariss, Mme Margaret Shannon, le Révérend Long Lim, et le Révérend Joseph Chambers). L’équipe de direction nommera un secrétaire et deux aumôniers avant notre prochaine rencontre. A cette première réunion, l’Evêque Présidente Katharine Jefferts Schori et la Présidente de la Chambre des Député(e)s Gay Jennings et le Directeur de la Convention générale Michael Barlowe nous ont joints et ils nous ont offert leurs aperçus précieux et ils nous ont rendus conscientes des ressources qui nous aideront dans notre tâche.Nous avons commencé le processus de dévelopement d’une stratégie d’engagement qui nous permettra à vivre dans notre promesse à la transparence tout en gardant la sanctité de la conversation sainte. En outre, nous voulons non seulement donner un aperçu de notre travail, mais aussi provoquer un processus parallèle de dialogue autour des questions d’identité, de structure et de culture à tous les niveaux de l’église. Afin de faciliter ce discernement, nous projetons d’offrir toute une gamme d’opportunités afin de recevoir des commentaires et des réactions de tous les coins de l’église et nous exhortons à tous et toutes les membres de réfléchir en prière à côté de nous et d’offrir leurs aperçus et leur sagesse. Ces opportunités se dévoileront dans les prochaines semaines.En nous appuyant sur la langue de la Résolution C095, nous avons choisi de nous appeler le Groupe de travail de ré-imaginer l’Eglise Episcopale: les structures, le gouvernement et l’administration (TREC, Task force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church, en anglais). Nous espérons que ceci transmet le sens de la portée de notre travail aussi bien que notre désir d’entreprendre un voyage avec toute l’église tandis que nous découvrons comment nous sommes appelé(e)s à être le corps du Christ dans le monde.Que le Saint-Esprit continue à bénir et guider l’église à travers de ce moment de changement et de nouvelle vie. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Richard Jordan says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention 2012, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tony Lauria says: Comments are closed. February 18, 2013 at 8:56 pm Never has so much been said by so few for so many! They have agreed to talk, to listen, to be very inclusive, and to act at some future point in such a way as not to disturb anyone. Congress could have not said it better! It reminds me of the Prime Minister’s adviser on the British sitcom “Yes Minister”. If he were giving the statement and with apologies to the writer of the sitcom it would go something like this “we have agreed that to agree is laudable whilst agreeing that to disagree is also agreeable and an essentially essential part of the holy conversation we shall have as we listen to the each other listen. In so doing we will accomplish that which is accomplishable given the agreed to agreements within the context of agreeable differences that are relevant and noteworthy of the relevant parties relative to those pertinent matters pertaining to that which is relevant”! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel February 19, 2013 at 9:11 am This post says it all. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Task force for church structural reform issues statement Submit a Press Release Father Les Singleton says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 General Convention, Structure Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN February 21, 2013 at 2:32 pm Agree that more “meat” will be needed in the future. Rector Washington, DC Richard Jordan says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Feb 18, 2013 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kimberly Clark says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 19, 2013 at 5:11 pm They should have to pay for their own paper.last_img read more

Canada: A new and creative thing

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Bruce MyersPosted Jul 5, 2013 Canada Joint Assembly, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Ecumenical & Interreligious In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and Susan Johnson, national bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, at the opening eucharist service in Ottawa. Photo: Simon Chambers[Anglican Journal] The Joint Assembly’s worship planning team was asked to come up with “a new and creative thing” for the gathering’s opening eucharist.They delivered. From beginning to end, it was no ordinary worship service.The liturgy opened with a series of video clips of congregations and individuals from across Canada, projected onto big screens throughout the plenary hall, offering the customary greeting: “The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.”Then, during the opening hymn, a 12-foot-tall inukshuk was taken apart, its various parts reassembled to create an altar on which the eucharist was celebrated, a font used for a remembrance of baptism and an ambo from which the scripture lessons were read.The worship planning team’s co-chairs said they chose to incorporate an inukshuk, a traditional marker for travellers used in the Arctic, because they were looking for a distinctively Canadian symbol.“Somehow a big beaver in the room didn’t quite cut it,” said Lutheran worship co-chair Eric Dyck.Anglican worship co-chair Catherine Ascah said the inukshuk was a good fit because its shape has “a cross-like feel to it,” while also being something highly identifiable and marking off a particular place—in this case, a 35,000 square-foot convention floor she describes as an “airport hanger.”A scripture passage from Acts recounting the baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch by Philip was alternately read by a lector in French and shown in pre-recorded video clips projected onto the big screens.The reading was interspersed with a thanksgiving for baptism and a renewal of baptismal vows, capped by a “waterless asperges.” Worship assistants─trailing long, flowing streams of blue fabric─ran between the tables of delegates, invoking the sprinkling rite that often accompanies of remembrance of baptism.In her sermon ELCIC National Bishop Susan Johnson exhorted the delegates to take seriously their baptismal commitment to bear witness to God’s word in the world, and challenged them to begin here at the Joint Assembly.“As you make new friends and meet old ones, fight the temptation to talk about the weather, or the length of time it takes to get up the escalators, or any other kind of filler conversation,” Bishop Johnson preached. “Instead, take the risk of sharing something about your faith. How have you experienced God’s love for the world? What is the faith story that you can share?”Archbishop Fred Hiltz presided at communion, intoning a eucharistic prayer that was an original composition for the Joint Assembly and will be used again at the closing service. After the bread and wine were consecrated at the altar they were distributed to the dozens of tables where delegates served each other communion.The liturgy concluded with a hymn, but no blessing or dismissal, which Ascah said is deliberately intended to frame the entire Joint Assembly in prayer.“We’re still praying,” she said. “We’re still worshipping and we’re still praying, and the final benediction is going to come at the closing eucharist. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canada: A new and creative thing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Church sees imperative role in racial justice, reconciliation

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Racial Justice & Reconciliation Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Morris says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (9) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Christopher L. Webber says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 21, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group August 22, 2014 at 10:28 am I truly believe that the Episcopal Church is in a unique position here. The church’s doctrine of “Inclusiveness” is truly the “Good News”. Our openess to dialog and conversation will set the bar and will allow for open and thoughtful communication. Blessings! Charlie + Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY August 21, 2014 at 6:15 pm The article speaks of an “all-white police force” in Ferguson. All other news reports I have seen speak of 2 or 2 black officers on a 53-man force. It doesn’t help resolve the issue to provide inaccurate information. Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA John C. Kimbrough says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Hope Boyd says: Christopher L. Webber says: August 26, 2014 at 2:33 pm Just because there is an incident between two people of different races does not mean that racism was involved, jumping to that conclusion without any evidence is incredibly harmful to all parties involved.two weeks ago there was a shooting in Salt Lake City by a black officer against an unarmed white youth, should we assume that the black officer is a racist and executed this kid because he is white. So far no Justice Dept., no riots, no media, no looting, no calls for officer to be executed or immediately being imprisoned without a trial, and no sermons on this shooting; apparently this shooting doesn’t fit the agenda.Sadly there are too many of our black youths dying in our streets, more sadly 91% of those deaths are caused by other black youths, to pretend they are being gunned down by the police is absurd, dishonest and harmful, too everyone involved. When we and leaders of the black community tell black kids that the police don’t like you because they are racist, we wonder why more black youths don’t want to join police dept.Maybe we should start judging people by the content of their character, not by the color of their skin January 9, 2015 at 9:58 pm We are all very imperfect people and it can be hard to know what is the best or right way to handle things…….I think if we have a good understanding of the teachings in The Bible and have made a strong connection with God and our fellow man, we will do the right thing in our lives and regarding the lives of others and how we act, react and interact with and to them regardless of our color, ethnicity, nationality, etc. Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Press Release Service Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York August 22, 2014 at 12:42 pm How refreshing to read about a Christian church that is embracing the teachings of Jesus without the usual populist, economic, and judgemental overlay that plagues so many religious organizations. Kudos to the Episcopal Church organization! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 21, 2014 at 7:09 pm This whole event has raised a multitude of issues, and certainly of feelings. I visited Ferguson and the very location where Michael Brown was killed, a few days ago. Talking with several in that neighborhood, I was impressed with the sense of calm, as well as the spirit of generosity and helpfulness they had toward me–I had needed directions several times! I have been closely following news reports daily, and nightly. One thing we need to do, other than realizing that this is a result in great part to systemic prejudice, discrimination, and injustice, is to take “a holy time” to wait for the results of ALL the facts to come out, through the judicial system, for we have local and federal attorneys, prosecutors, and so forth that will be gathering the facts, evidence and the like for many days ahead. And we need to state the facts we know so far with accuracy. Even this piece states that the Ferguson police force is all white. Assuredly only 3 of 53 are black, but that’s still SOME difference right there so far as the facts are concerned. We need to know that the vast majority, some 150 of 156 or so, of those arrested for violent acts in all the protest events so far were outsiders, from beyond the borders of the city of Ferguson, some arriving here from other states and cities (like New York, Chicago, and San Diego). They have apparently come here just to foment trouble, some of it violent. This is all a very confusing and complex thing, so no one should jump to conclusions about exactly what happened, is occurring, and why, in this most sad and tragic episode.One of the most important things we should do as Episcopalians going forward is work to integrate our congregations, and do much in the way of growing to understand and learn from others within them, in terms of different races. We did both in my last church that I served for 24 years, prior to retirement. Before much of Chester Hine’s good Dismantling Racism work, we had a series of most helpful sessions, with a lay person and myself trained beforehand as facilitators by a Jewish-Christian group training many for this interracial program. My church, by the way, was all white when I went there (in the general area of North St. Louis County in which Ferguson is located, a bit farther way from the City of St. Louis). When I left, it was about 50 percent white and the same percentage black. Some were Nigerians. This was not hard to do, since we were located in a very bi-racial area of the county. Leadership and a strong sense of mission and outreach came from both races.I have learned and come to understand how just knowing people, worshiping with them, and being friends can make such a difference, in this area of sometimes great trouble and even enmity in our society. And as well this is true in differences and prejudice and injustice in the area of sexual orientation, since I’ve been for over 14 years in a parish that has a good percentage of LGBT folks as members, with a partnered gay man as rector. It is on he local level of church membership and involvement, worship , witness and mission and ministry where these crucial matters in our society will be changed for the better, I now, thankfully, know by personal experience. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Dan Tootle says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: This story has been updated. Though the Ferguson police department is predominantly white, it is not all-white as previously stated. While the fatal police shooting of an unarmed African-American teenager continued to spark protests in Ferguson, Missouri, Episcopalians throughout the U.S. were grappling with a tough reality that it could have happened just about anywhere and with a difficult question: what should the church be doing about it?Despite the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown and its violent aftermath the hope “is that it will finally be the wakeup call we need in this country to address this issue,” Bishop Stacy Sauls, Episcopal Church chief operating officer, told ENS. “Because, in my opinion, race relations in the United States have been getting worse, not better.”Festering tensions between the predominantly white Ferguson police department and the African-American community erupted in violence after officer Darren Wilson fatally shot 18-year-old Brown. Conflicting eyewitness reports followed and an independent autopsy revealed Brown had been shot six times. Ferguson police subsequently identified Brown as a robbery suspect.Regardless, local clergy and residents decried the level of police violence directed against the predominantly African-American community.Sauls said Christian churches sparked the civil rights movement “and I think we’re seeing a very strong call for us to be involved again. One thing we can do, is bring people together to talk, not only on a local level or a regional level, but for a national conversation. That can have a very positive impact.”Similarly, in an Aug. 20 statement young adult members of the Union of Black Episcopalians (UBE) cited, among other things, “the subculture of prejudice against black people resulting in headline after headline of another American lying dead in neighborhood streets.”The statement called upon UBE chapters across the country to help carry the message “so that the prophetic voice of the Episcopal Church resounds in speaking against the legacy of institutionalized oppression in the United States and across our world.”Carrying the message: prophetic voicesChester Hines began serving as a trainer at anti-racism workshops in the Diocese of Missouri by choice, and because of circumstance.“I grew up in segregated St. Louis. It doesn’t matter what institution you identify in St. Louis they have always – in my experience – been segregated, even after the federal Civil Rights legislation of 1964,” said Hines, 67, an auditor and former teacher who serves in a field placement assignment at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Creve Coeur, as part of the diocesan ordination process.Hines said that, not only was he not surprised that racial tensions erupted in nearby Ferguson after Brown’s shooting, “I was surprised it hadn’t happened sooner and in more places.”He passed on his own life lessons to twin sons, Christian and Christopher, as they came of age, in the interest of preservation, he said. “I educated my children to understand and know about segregation, race and racism, that it existed in St. Louis,” he said. “I also told them how it manifested itself.“I taught them as they became 10 years of age, that they would be encountered by the police, by security when they went to the mall with their friends, and they had white friends. I taught them the lessons that I knew they were going to have to learn in order to be out in the community because these were the lessons I had to learn and it hadn’t changed,” he said.“I told them what was going to happen but, more importantly I told them, here is your response: You engage the policeman with respect and regard, yes sir, no sir. You give your name. You follow his directions, even if you have to be arrested.“Because, here’s what’s at risk: if you aggravate or in some way convey to that policeman that you’re challenging him, he’s going to harm you in some physical way or bust your head and once your head is busted or you’re shot up, it can’t be fixed.“However, it can be fixed if you’re taken to the jailhouse, because I can come and get you from there. But a physical confrontation, I can’t do anything about.”Now that both sons are 31 and attorneys, he says, “Every day I wake up and say ‘Amen.’”‘Race is so hard to talk about’ – so listenThe Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, was “trying to listen to folks on the ground” in Ferguson and counseling others to do likewise.He also invited cathedral parishioners, following the Aug. 17 main Sunday service, to spend time together, with no judgment, no comments, no arguing, just plain listening to each other. “There were tears, anger, confusion, a wide variety of feelings were represented but there was just this holy space and I realized it was grace,” he said.“There are people who’ve said ‘I don’t have any place to say this. We are afraid of talking about race; afraid we will say the wrong thing. We need a place where we can stumble.“This is something we can do as a church; provide that safe space, to talk about race, because race is so hard to talk about,” he said. “But, I told them all, if you’re not talking, don’t be thinking about what you’re going to say next, just listen.”The Rev. Eric H. F. Law, an Episcopal priest and founder of the Los Angeles-based Kaleidoscope Institute, which offers leadership development and diversity training in multicultural and changing environments agreed “the first step has to be listening to the historically powerless folks.“The big question to ask is, do you want to continue to have these sporadic explosions or do you really want to find a way to engage people so you have real relationships?” said Law, who helped to coordinate reconciliation efforts after the 1992 Los Angeles riots.“The bottom line is, do we have real friendships across racial lines in this country, and can our church facilitate that and not in a superficial way but in a way that we can really attempt to understand each other?”Sauls said that after a Florida jury found neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman not guilty in July 2013 in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, the Episcopal Church began working toward creating for the first time a missioner for racial reconciliation. In June 2014, Heidi Kim was appointed to that position and Charles Wynder was named the Episcopal Church missioner for social justice and advocacy.“I really do believe that if we take seriously this notion that we are all members of the Body of Christ, then we have to behave differently toward one another. The first step is listening to people that think completely differently than you do,” said Kim. In her new role, she is responsible for facilitating the establishment and growth of networks in the church to confront the structural issues of racism in the church and society. Wynder is responsible for engaging Episcopalians in building, resourcing and empowering advocacy movements and networks for social justice at a local and community level.“There was an incident in New York this summer,” said Sauls, referring to the chokehold death of Eric Garner, an African-American man, by New York City police officers, “and now the Michael Brown case, so it’s not an uncommon occurrence.”“Unfortunately,” he said, “this is one of the saddest statements I can make, that we all knew this day would come again.”The Interfaith Center of New York on Aug. 21 welcomed New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s outreach to religious leaders as a way to “heal and deepen the relationship between police and community” in the wake of Garner’s death. “We applaud senior religious leaders for coming together for dialogue at this critical moment,” the statement said, recognizing the crucial role that grassroots faith leaders play “in maintaining peaceful co-existence in their neighborhoods.”Anti-racism training; becoming the beloved communityFor Hines and others who lead anti-racism trainings across the church, resources include the history of the Episcopal Church; the House of Bishops 1994 pastoral letter on the sin of racism; General Convention resolutions on the subject, and some basic definitions.“We talk about the history of the Episcopal Church, and it’s mixed,” Hines said. “We had priests and leadership in the Episcopal Church that were slave owners and members of the Ku Klux Klan.”Henry Shaw, for example, was a wealthy local landowner and philanthropist “who only in the recent past did we recognize was one of the largest slave owners in St. Louis,” Hines says. “Much of the wealth he left to the Episcopal Church came as a result of the slaves he owned.”Agreement on definitions of words like prejudice, discrimination, bigotry also “get us to a point where we talk to each other and can understand hopefully what the other person is saying,” he said.In Atlanta, a name change, from the diocesan antiracism commission to the “Beloved Community Commission for Dismantling Racism” shifted participants to an understanding that “we need to dismantle racism as a part of our spiritual formation and not just so we can check off the box to be on the vestry and be a priest,” said Catherine Meeks, 68, a retired college professor and commission member.“We’ve gone from a lot of open hostility toward our training to having people invite us now to come to their individual parishes,” said Meeks, a member of St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church in Morrow, Georgia, near Atlanta.Celebrating Holy Communion at the start of sessions also “focused the whole day around the umbrella that this is who we are as family; this is the work we have to do to help our family get well.”The daughter of an Arkansas sharecropper and schoolteacher mother “we were really poor,” Meeks recalled. “We were victims, in many ways, of racism. I saw my father very wounded by that and it’s why I’ve been trying so adamantly to change it,” she said.“I tried really hard not to pass on a lot of the fear and rage that my father had to my two sons,” she added. “And I’ve really had to work hard to overcome some of the fear.“I tried very hard to raise my children to feel they had a place in the world and could be independent people, but with the realization they’re black in America. The systems here are not designed for the benefit of people of color,” she said.It means, she said, living a dualistic existence. “You believe you’re a child of God and that God cares for you and you have a place in the world and you will get the blessings that are yours to have. But, you live in a land where there are a lot of systems designed to keep that from happening, and you have to live in the reality of that.”Hope: ‘in the church we have a chance’Sauls said that follow-ups are in the planning stages for groundbreaking events like the Nov. 2013 Episcopal Church’s “Fifty Years Later: the State of Race in America” in Jackson, Mississippi, and an Oct. 2008 service of repentance at the historic African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia.He said the Episcopal Church’s Office of Justice and Advocacy Ministries is compiling resources for communities of faith “to begin conversations. We’re beginning to start to bring leaders across the church together to continue the conversation and to build on the work we did last November” in Jackson.Kinman said that he had received offers from colleagues across the country, to come to Ferguson to join protests.“I’m telling people that, wherever you are in this country, if you really want to help, then use this moment of opportunity and gather your congregation, your people, and ask the question, why do you think this is happening?” he said.“Do some education about race and class, power and privilege. Ask the questions: who in your community is Michael Brown? Who in your community would be those folks on the streets of Ferguson right now? What is their experience of being black or brown in your community?”Meeks agreed. “This situation in Ferguson just highlights that we’ve been trying to pretend we’re at some place we’re not. It could be anywhere in the country, and we know this. Ferguson is just one little tip of the iceberg. We really need to pay attention.”But there is much cause for hope, especially within the church, she said.“My hope lies in the fact that I believe in the church we have a chance. Celebrating Holy Communion is so important because it reminds us that we’re committed to something bigger than ourselves. I just believe the church is the place where we can develop real dialogue, real trust and model a different way to be with one another,” she added.“We’ve got a long way to go to get there, but I think we stand a chance if we are willing to be open to what we say we believe.”Hines said he contradicted a participant at an antiracism training he led last week in Sikeston, who told him real change seemed impossible.“My hope is eternal but change is very slow, he said. “I reminded him that, prior to 1964 and the Civil Rights legislation, I could not have come to Sikeston and stayed anyplace but with a relative. Change is possible if we agree it is and move forward in that direction.”He added: “I think of this work as necessary and vital to the salvation of the Episcopal Church. We look at our history and then we look at our current events and then we identify for ourselves what do we want to look like 10 years from now.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Paul Heet says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA August 23, 2014 at 12:47 am This article impressed me in the beginning statements. My heart sinks knowing that we refuse to deal with black on black crime, black on white crime, and also the part the use of drugs affects the miserable situation we are in today. We’ve learned over and over again that there are issues that are the root causes of our dilemma. Note who buys the drugs funding our devastation: Hollywood’s top guys and gals, major league players, and now we know people in and aspiring for national leadership up to and including the White House, many people who attend church and The Episcopal Church no less. We’ve got to control our appetites for “high” and set boundaries so our lives are worth imaging by all we come in touch with before we can call or enlist others to do so too. The Body of Christ is not every living soul on the earth. Try telling that to ISIS or HAMAS or AL QUEDA or Secularist or Atheist or avowed Marxist and Communist. Understand that the Body of Christ must be THE Body of Christ and not a bunch of folks looking for a Woodstock experience. Jesus is and will remain the answer to healthy boundaries and objective goals that changes hearts and lives towards wholeness, LOVE, respect, community, and the ability to love all those that reject the Body of Christ but whom Jesus is bidding come live THE life of Christ sans drugs and other addictions who’s cost to buy bring the necessary food chain into play killing that we’ve been responsible to go share life abundant with daily. My family, intimate and larger, is bi-racial. We live in peace and love allowing us to speak truth to one another. Race will never be the real issue. The real issue: the heart, the soul, the mind, and our deeds governed by the strength of the HOLY SPIRT whose gift to us is to reveal the LORDSHIP OF JESUS! God bless everyone seeking to be an instrument of His peace! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 22, 2014 at 10:46 am I wasn’t suggesting that 2-3 black officers was wonderful – it’s dreadful – but just that getting the facts straight is a pretty basic prerequisite of constructive debate. Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 22, 2014 at 8:51 am Hopefully IF a more reasonable racial balance can be achieved within the Ferguson police force, then the seemingly prevalent attitude within the present force members of being reactive and repressive toward the large African-American population can be moved to one of being protective and of service. Disarming the Ferguson Police “militia” is going to be as important as transforming the police/citizen relationship to one of mutual respect and trust. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Charles C. Warwick says: Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ George Mims says: Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Church sees imperative role in racial justice, reconciliation Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

International consultation concludes with renewed climate justice commitment

first_imgInternational consultation concludes with renewed climate justice commitment Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Environment & Climate Change Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Gavin Drake Posted Jul 14, 2016 Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans from around the world have made a new commitment to fight for climate justice. The commitment was made at the conclusion of an international consultation in Fiji organised by the Anglican mission agency United Society.The society’s global relations director, Rachel Parry, said that “While affirming the current direction and areas of mission with which the United Society is engaging around the world, this consultation allowed us to focus more deeply on mission priorities in the different contexts from which delegates came, and highlighted some particular areas on which we will endeavour to focus in the coming three years.“The next few months will see these priorities sharpened and begin to be shaped into practical responses and shared areas of collaboration.”Anglicans from 19 provinces were represented at the consultation, to “understood more about the need to redouble their efforts to engage with climate justice,” the United Society said. Fiji was chosen as the host venue because it is experiencing severe consequences of global warming – some 676 villages in the country are at risk of flooding due to rising sea levels.The Church of England’s Bishop of Lincoln, Christopher Lowson, said that the consultation had taught him “the connection between man, God and the environment.”“These are things that I knew with my head, but now I understand them more with my heart because of being in this context and meeting people from this part of the world,” he said. “[I’m] understanding for the first time the real implications of climate change upon real people’s lives.“I’m clear that it’s something we have to address creatively and imaginatively. We’ve got to bend our backs to do something to meet our challenges. And I hope that people across the world within the Anglican Communion and in the Diocese of Lincoln can work hard to plan and work to try to play our part in reducing global warming.”The Archbishop of the West Indies, Bishop of Barbados John Holder, commented: “We realise that we are all connected in this world. We all face the same problems in terms of climate [and] in terms of human abuse. And I think what we’ve done in this gathering is to commit ourselves to make [the United Society] stronger and to make our world and our church far better.”The host of the consultation, Winston Halapua, the Bishop of Polynesia and one of three Archbishops of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia, described the consultation as “historic”, adding: “In the last few days, issues were brought forward from all the different contexts.“We shared them, and in the midst of them we tried to find God’s will; where is Jesus in our whole engagement in God’s mission? It’s so wonderful as we are here as members of the Anglican Communion. . .“We are no longer the same people as when we started. When we gather together in Christ, we move together. When leave this place, we are renewed people for the mission of God.”Rachel Parry said that the consultation participants “all learned a great deal about the far-reaching and wide-ranging impacts of climate change. The church is ideally placed to help raise awareness because it is involved in education and community at all levels.“The consultation emphasised sharing from different contexts, so during the week we heard about the huge challenges facing Christians in many regions. This developed our mutual understanding about a number of issues, which is vital if we are to work together more effectively as a global church in jointly tackling related issues of justice. . .“Delegates agreed there was a particular need to encourage children to acquire an affinity with the environment, as well as an opportunity for the church to help communities learn about land management to mitigate against the destructive impact of climate change.” New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Australia: Primate welcomes investigation into youth detention

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth & Young Adults Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Aug 5, 2016 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Australia: Primate welcomes investigation into youth detention Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Por qué servir 2017: Una conferencia de discernimiento vocacional episcopal…

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth & Young Adults This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ethnic Ministries, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Los jóvenes adultos de color están invitados a examinar sus dones y explorar oportunidades en un retiro de la Iglesia Episcopal, Por qué servir 2017, del lunes 12 de junio al jueves, 15 de junio.Patrocinado por el Departamento de los Ministerios Étnicos de la Iglesia Episcopal, Por qué servir 2017 se llevará a cabo en Bexley Seabury, Chicago, ILLos invitados a asistir a esta conferencia de compañerismo, entrenamiento, discernimiento y autocuidado son los jóvenes adultos (de 18 a 30 años) de las comunidades asioamericana, negra, indígena/nativo americano y latino/hispano de la Iglesia Episcopal, así como aquellos que desean servir en los ministerios étnicos.“Dondequiera que se encuentre en su camino la juventud adulta, es un momento de transición y de elecciones, pero no tienen que hacerlo solos”, comentó el Revdo. Canónigo Anthony Guillen, Latino /Hispano, en nombre de los Misioneros Étnicos: el Revdo. Bradley Hauff, indígena; la reverenda Ángela Ifill, negra, y el Revdo. Winfred Vergara, asioamericano. “En esta conferencia, están para ayudarle, ponentes principales, líderes de talleres, compañeros jóvenes y los misioneros. Esperamos que se una a nosotros en esta experiencia transformadora”.La inscripción son 75 dólares que incluyen comidas, alojamiento, transporte terrestre, y honorarios de la conferencia. La inscripción no incluye los pasajes aéreos.La fecha límite de inscripción es el 31 de mayo.La información /inscripción de Por qué servir 2017 está aquí.Para obtener más información, póngase en contacto con Angeline Cabanban al 212-716-6186 o [email protected] Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Posted Mar 27, 2017 Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Por qué servir 2017: Una conferencia de discernimiento vocacional episcopal para jóvenes adultos de color Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, last_img read more

Charlottesville Episcopalians join peaceful gatherings marking year after hate groups’…

first_img August 15, 2018 at 6:05 pm Matt are you referring to those mainstream “unbiased” universities whose students shout down, curse at, and physically threaten conservatives who are invited to speak on campus? The same universities whose students raise hell if, God forbid, a conservative is invited to speak at their graduation? The same universities whose students demand the termination of professors who aren’t afraid to voice conservative viewpoints and who challenge left-wing dogma? And you’re right Matt how silly of me to think that the press is biased against conservatives. How could I possibly think that mainstream papers like the New York Times, and the Washington Post, (among many others) could be anything but fair to conservatives in their stories and editorials? Not to mention mainstream magazines such as Rolling Stone, Mother Jones and The Nation who ALWAYS go out of their way to show both sides of an issue. And let’s not forget CNN and MSNBC, those mainstream bastions of fair and non-biased television journalism. Thank you Matt for making me see the light! Matt Ouellette says: John Hobart says: The Charlottesville Clergy Collective holds an interfaith service Aug. 9, 2018, at The Haven as part of a week of faith-based activities to mark one year since hate groups’ demonstrations ended in violence in this Virginia city. Photo: Charlottesville Clergy Collective[Episcopal News Service] The three Episcopal congregations in Charlottesville, Virginia, are participating in a weeklong series of ecumenical and interreligious events to promote peace, faith and unity one year after a white supremacist demonstration turned violent, thrusting the city into a national debate over race and Confederate symbols.Prayer gatherings have been scheduled twice each weekday this week by the Charlottesville Clergy Collective, of which the Episcopal churches are a part. The collective also organized an evening worship service Aug. 9 described as “a service of gratitude, repentance and hope.” And an afternoon “singout” on Aug. 12 is expected to draw hundreds.“There was a somewhat unspoken consensus that we wanted – we being Charlottesville – we wanted to be in charge of what this weekend looks like,” the Rev. Cass Bailey, vicar of Trinity Episcopal Church, told Episcopal News Service this week. “There just was a sense that we wanted to project a positive image.”That positive image is intended as a contrast to the events of Aug. 12, 2017, when one counterprotester died amid clashes with a large assembly of neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and other hate groups who had come to Charlottesville for a “Unite the Right” rally in opposition to the city’s plans to remove two statues of Confederate generals.A year later, the legal battle continues over the statues, which remain in place. The white supremacists appear to be focusing on a new rally in Washington, D.C., on the anniversary rather than returning to Charlottesville en masse, which has relieved some anxiety locally, Bailey said.The Rev. Cass Bailey, shown speaking Aug. 9 at the interfaith service, is vicar of Trinity Episcopal Church in Charlottesville, Virginia. “There just was a sense that we wanted to project a positive image,” he said earlier in the week. Photo: Charlottesville Clergy Collective“Police are still gearing up for the worst-case scenario,” Bailey said. The city’s security measures this weekend will make it virtually impossible to hold worship services downtown, so Christ Episcopal Church decided to close for the weekend and will worship in the morning with Bailey’s congregation at Trinity and in the evening at St. Paul’s Memorial Church.The Diocese of Virginia and its clergy and congregations, meanwhile, have expressed support for the churches in Charlottesville a year after many of them came to the city and joined with the faith community in standing against racism and hatred.“I think that God has given an imperative to the church to hold firm in our resolve to stand in the public square in opposition to anything that is contrary to Jesus’ teaching that we must love one another – no exceptions,” Virginia Bishop Shannon Johnston said in a written statement. “We will therefore always stand up to hate-mongering, and we will continue to do all in our power to ensure that the world around us knows without question that the love of God is present to us and will always prevail over division and hatred.”The events last year in Charlottesville turned this Southern university town into a flashpoint in the larger debate over the Confederacy and the Civil War’s ugly but enduring legacy of racism. Episcopal institutions, too, were swept up in that debate.Washington National Cathedral altered its stained-glass windows to remove Confederate symbols. Sewanee: University of the South moved a Confederate general’s monument from a prominent byway in Sewanee, Tennessee, to a campus cemetery. An Episcopal church in Lexington, Virginia, that had been known as the R. E. Lee Memorial Church in honor of the Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee changed its name to Grace Episcopal.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry stands at the foot of the Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Sept. 7, 2017, with the Rev. Paul Walker, rector of the nearby Christ Episcopal Church. The statue had been wrapped in plastic while the city fights a legal challenge to the monument’s removal. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceWhen Presiding Bishop Michael Curry traveled to Charlottesville last September for a pastoral visit, most of his itinerary was filled with clergy meetings and an evening sermon promoting love over hate, though he also took a few minutes to reflect at the foot of the downtown statue of Lee, which at the time was wrapped in a black tarp.The tarp is gone, and the statue is visible from the second-floor office window of the Rev. Paul Walker, rector of the historic Christ Episcopal Church in downtown Charlottesville. He returned just last week from a four-month sabbatical and was not involved in the decision by other church leaders to close this weekend, but he thinks it was the right call. Other downtown churches were making similar arrangements to worship elsewhere.“The whole area will be on lockdown,” Walker said. “And there is a credible threat of violence downtown.”Virginia’s governor also has declared a state of emergency in Charlottesville because of the potential for renewed unrest.“I’m very grateful that all hands are on deck for the weekend because last year was horrible, deeply traumatic for our city,” Walker said.Even a small group of white supremacists could set off a crisis, said the Rev. Will Peyton, rector of St. Paul’s Memorial Church, which overlooks the campus of the University of Virginia.“I think there’s a strong sense, in terms of the city and state police … that law enforcement and government are going to be overprepared rather than underprepared,” Peyton said.City officials were criticized last year for being unprepared for the “Unite the Right” rally, starting with the white supremacists’ torchlight march on the evening of Aug. 11 at the University of Virginia rotunda, while Episcopalians and other concerned citizens had gathered across the street at St. Paul’s for a prayer service. The next morning, members of St. Paul’s, Trinity Episcopal and Christ Episcopal joined an interfaith prayer service and then participated in their own march to Emancipation Park to rally against the supremacists’ event planned at the park, the site of the Lee statue.Before the supremacists’ rally even started, the city deemed it an unlawful assembly and forbade it from proceeding as club-wielding and gun-toting white supremacists began clashing with counterprotesters, some of whom also carried weapons. The street clashes continued and even escalated, and the police force was later blamed for failing to keep the violence in check.That afternoon, a crowd of counterprotesters was rammed by a car, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others. A 20-year-old Nazi sympathizer from Ohio was charged with Heyer’s murder.Since then, Charlottesville has seen a dramatic turnover in its leadership. The city attorney left, the city manager is leaving, and Charlottesville has a new mayor, Nikuyah Walker, the first black woman to hold that office. And after the former police chief stepped down in the face of a report critical of his department’s response on Aug. 12, Charlottesville hired a new police chief, RaShall Brackney.That’s not to say that Charlottesville has solved all of its own problems, some of which stem from long-simmering racial divisions that were brought to the surface by last year’s violence.“I would say that there’s still an extraordinary amount of tension and animosity in public life here,” Walker said. “I think that Charlottesville is really struggling to cope with what happened on Aug. 12 and the history of racism here. And we’re a city steeped in history, and all of that is at the fore now.”Peyton, rector of St. Paul’s, described the community as suffering from a sort of collective post-traumatic stress disorder, still shell-shocked from the events of a year ago, and on the anniversary, the national spotlight has returned along with memories of the horror of that day.At the same time, “the local issues are the same as they are in many, many American cities, issues of housing and wages and entrenched structural racism,” he said. “We’re no different than a lot of other places in those regards.”As for the legal battle over the statues – which, at least nominally, was the catalyst for last year’s violence – most accept that “to a certain extent it’s out of our hands,” said Bailey, vicar of Trinity Episcopal.But the work of racial reconciliation continues. Bailey’s church recently received a $11,000 grant from a local foundation to launch an African-American history project, featuring video interviews with older members of the community and workshops on the issue of historical trauma. The first event will be held this fall.“In general, the community has acknowledged that there is a problem here in Charlottesville and the events of Aug. 12 were the erupting of underlying tensions,” Bailey said. “The work of the government and the work of the civic leader is to address those underlying tensions, and people have been trying in various ways to do that.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Advocacy Peace & Justice, August 15, 2018 at 10:43 pm I would say instead that the president brings that criticism upon himself. That’s not a sign of bias. Ignoring the president’s faults and treating him with kid gloves, like Fox News does the vast majority of the time, is a sign of bias. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem David A Salmon says: Doug Desper says: Terry Francis says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 16, 2018 at 11:18 am Matt – you are not just wrong about liberal bias in the media, but laughably wrong. Even the Washington Post recognizes the bias as does article after article and study afrter study. Please do a minimum of research. You will see where the myth really resides.https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/blogs/erik-wemple/wp/2017/01/27/dear-mainstream-media-why-so-liberal/ Doug Collins says: Ecumenical & Interreligious, Matt Ouellette says: August 13, 2018 at 9:44 pm Wait, you said you were not making a moral equivalence between Antifa and fascist groups, but in your second paragraph you morally equated the two. Which is it? August 13, 2018 at 10:09 am Last I checked, Antifa didn’t drive a car into a crowd of protestors and kill someone. It is a false narrative to claim that there are bad actors on many sides. Antifa does indeed go to far in certain circumstances, but you cannot equate them with Nazis. August 16, 2018 at 12:59 pm Mr. Salmon,I direct you to the comments I made toward Mr. Collins above. The fact of the matter is that the media is not “liberally biased” it is that conservatives are so used to having a single stream of media information that once they step outside that cone of silence and experience a world outside of that influence (for example, with students going to university and being exposed to new ideals and beliefs) individuals react negatively because this new information challenges and changes their world views. Furthermore, the news article you posted does little to actually reinforce your position. The article even says “there is no conspiracy to push the media to the left” even if most journalists identify as liberals. Perhaps reading these and doing a “minimum” of your own research would help:https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/editorials/2018/08/15/editorial/Kt0NFFonrxqBI6NqqennvL/story.htmlhttps://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2018/08/why-a-free-press-matters/567676/https://wtop.com/national/2018/07/more-republicans-in-the-news-thats-not-media-bias/ Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 13, 2018 at 5:04 pm Robbie,What does the comment made by the Deacon have to do with the SPLC? Robbie Johnson says: August 16, 2018 at 4:13 pm Perhaps this source, which directly addresses claims of media bias, will be more suitable to you. It lays out clear arguments against the claim that the media has a liberal bias (yes, it is an opinion piece, but hopefully you are willing to overlook that and consider the arguments):https://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article170317567.htmlAgain, arguing that we are simply basing our arguments off of emotion is disingenuous. We have provided sources to back up our opinions as well. You just don’t seem to agree with them. Jordan Sakal says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (47) Jordan Sakal says: August 13, 2018 at 4:19 pm Matt – both the alt-right of KKK and neo—Nazis and the hard left of Antifa are the lunatic fringe of American politics. While Antifa has killed anyone (yet) their violence is well documented (including against the press). This includes a professor responsible for attacking 7 people (not Nazis btw) by hitting them on the head with a bike lock. All people should denounce both sides of the extreme lunatic fringe. Political violence is not acceptable in any form. You constantly talk about moral positions that everyone agrees with; well this is one – if you are making excuses for the violent left or right, you have no moral ground on which to stand.https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/the-intersect/wp/2017/05/29/a-man-clobbered-trump-supporters-with-a-bike-lock-the-internet-went-looking-for-him/ David A Salmon says: August 10, 2018 at 11:51 pm I’m glad to hear what the local Episcopal churches are doing in Charlottesville. Trinity Episcopal was the first Episcopal church I attended, and I was a member of St. Paul’s Memorial when I was received in 2002. Matt Ouellette says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Racial Justice & Reconciliation August 14, 2018 at 7:36 pm Robbie,Got any proof of that? Dianne Aid says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET David A salmon says: Jordan Sakal says: David A Salmon says: August 13, 2018 at 6:22 pm Matt & Jordan – Antifa proudly displays the flag of the Soviet Union, a regime that murdered 30 million of their own people and was the ideological leader of a belief that resulted in the deaths of 100 million people in the 20th century. That might not mean anything to you, but for many of us, that makes them as bad as the fascists. Tags August 13, 2018 at 6:30 pm I encourage you to re-read the article I posted. It addresses you precise argument and why it doesn’t work. August 15, 2018 at 7:54 am Terry, Dave and Doug, give it up. You are never going to convince Jordan and Matt to see the other side of things. The will vehemently defend their position and you will waste the better part of your day researching and answering their questions and they still will not budge off their positions. Even if you do make a good point they will argue the morality of their point. Eventually, all of us that see reality and believe in conservative values will move on from TEC and those that love TEC’s support for liberal positions will be left to financially support the bloated EC hierarchy or it will crumble under its own weight. David A Salmon says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 15, 2018 at 9:13 am Robbie,First let me say this, please get the name of the organisation correct before you begin discussing them. They are the Southern Poverty Law Center.Secondly, Focus on the Family and the AFA are anti-LGBTQ+ organisations which strongly advocate for the dehumanisation and frank murder of LGBTQ+ Americans, (Their leaders were Tony Perkins and Bryan Fischer) they hold that we are sub-humans who do not deserve the right to life, let alone the right to marry, or to exist as citizens of this country. They are the very definition of a hate group.A woman’s right to bodily autonomy in this country is federally protected (at least for now) and as such anti-abortion groups who have done things like firebomb clinics or murder/attack/threaten doctors and nurses and other medical providers as well as those who violently protest and attack women who need these services are again, the very definition of a hate organisation.As for BYU and Liberty University, I have not seen anything on the SPLC Hate Map regarding them.On “Hetero marriage only” folks and those that support the current occupier of the White House. I have not seen it listed where those people or organisations are classed as hate groups by the SPLC excepting for when those groups fall into a category of hate (for example Anti-LGBTQ+ or Anti-Abortion etc)As for the SCV they have committed acts or espoused hate against other marginalised groups which as a result has them labelled as such (again, anti-black, anti-LGBTQ+ etc etc) it is not that these groups and organisations listed here are not “genuflecting” to the “left” as you put it, rather they are committing acts of hate and deserve to be recognised for it. The SBC is not listed as a hate group by the SPLC. August 14, 2018 at 2:55 pm Matt, the bottom line is you condemn (and rightfully so) those on the right who espouse hate and intolerance but pretty much give a slap on the wrist to those on the left whose hatred is just as reprehenable. You may not defend Antifa but you are nowhere near as enthusiastic in your condemnations regarding them.Such a group shouldn’t have to commit murder (ie driving a truck into a crowd) in order to get equal condemnation on your part. Equating Antifa to neo-nazis is not disingenuous in the least. Hate is hate. The fact that you merely “disagree” with their tactics says it all. Antifa may not have started out as a hate group but it certainly is now. You absolutely ARE splitting hairs in regards to these groups. And I agree with Mr Salmon’s opinion about the SPLC. That organization is a joke.(Unless you are leftward-leaning like they are). Your refusal Matt, and others like you to put hatemongers of the left on the same moral plane as hatemongers of the right is one of the reasons this country is so divided. August 13, 2018 at 6:47 pm Matt – Nope, I choose to condemn all hate groups, you choose to split hairs to support a hate group. That is on your head and is a reflection of your morality August 14, 2018 at 3:18 pm Mr. Francis, Thank you for at least condemning hate groups on the right. You also say though that groups like Antifa are equally as reprehensible. I do not disagree with you that they are reprehensible. However, like you say we (on the Left) do not carry our condemnations as far as you do and for that we should be shamed/pilloried for that stance. That’s your belief of the facts, just like we have our beliefs as well. Despite our best efforts to be conciliatory I do not think we will come to an agreement on that point of view (and that’s okay, we can agree to disagree) It was my point about the SPLC that you’re also questioning here. You call that organisation a joke without any evidence, and they do good work when they compile their “Hate Map” lists. It demonstrates what groups are active which spread messages of hate, whether that hate is Anti-Gay, Anti-Black, Anti-Christian, Anti-Semitic, so on and so forth, the SPLC does good work in showing us a reference of where hate is active in our American consciousness. Matt Ouellette says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA August 13, 2018 at 5:47 pm Jordan – the person in question violently attacked seven people; charges were not dropped they were plea bargained down three years probation which is a travesty. You call that the best part?Yes, I gave just one example of the violence and brutal behavior of Antifa. You might want to conduct some research to see just how violent they behave. Like their counterparts on the lunatic right who fly the Nazi flag, symbol of a brutal regime, Antifa flies the flag of the Soviet Union, another brutal regime. Calling things one-sided is just another way of condoning actions. Both sides need to be condemned.https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.mercurynews.com/2018/08/09/california-anti-trump-protester-gets-probation-for-assault/amp/ Bill Louis says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 15, 2018 at 8:34 am It’s not like the conservatives on this site have been willing to budge from their positions either. To claim that only those that believe in conservative values see reality or are willing to entertain the ideas of the other side is disingenuous, especially considering that in America, many conservatives are quick to label mainstream sources and institutions that disagree with their positions (the press, universities, scientists, etc.) as biased against them. August 14, 2018 at 7:47 am I never defended Antifa, David. I already said I disagree with their violent tactics. What I have done is point out how it is disingenuous to equate Antifa to neo-Nazis and fascist groups. To paraphrase from the CBC article I posted above (which I still recommend you read in full), Antifa was not founded as a hate group to promote communism and leftist ideology, but to combat the spread of fascism. While there are some hateful fringe members who fly the hammer and sickle, they are not essential members and the group could easily exist without them. Nazism, however, is founded on the belief that others are genetically inferior, and thus hate is essential to its existence. Those two things are not morally equal, as one group is fighting against a hateful ideology and one is fighting for the spread of hateful ideology. That is not an endorsement of Antifa, which is still immoral for engaging in acts of violence, but it is a statement that Antifa is the lesser of two evils when compared to Nazis and fascist groups.Also, what is the point in calling someone out for agreeing with my positions? I see conservative posters come to the defense of each other all the time in these comment sections. Is it only acceptable when conservatives do it? Do you think you could focus on the arguments made instead of making ad hominem attacks against posters? Matt Ouellette says: Robbie Johnson says: Jordan Sakal says: Jordan Sakal says: center_img Matt Ouellette says: August 13, 2018 at 5:57 pm Mr. Salmon,I used the term best in a sarcastic tone, as there is no access to italics here I have no way of denoting sarcasm, I apologise for that. However, like Mr. Ouellette claims I think it’s wrong to claim that Antifa are equivalent to fascists. August 30, 2018 at 4:26 am While I don’t think very many people condone the fringe groups on either the right or the left, they are few in number and don’t have much power. On the other hand, more mainstream hate groups like the republicans and democrats, while marginally less hateful, are very powerful and have done far more damage than the fringe crazies. Giving the fringe groups the attention they crave will accomplish nothing. Doug Collins says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Matt Ouellette says: August 15, 2018 at 10:02 pm Mr. Francis,Mr. Ouellette did not claim in his post that universities, the press, etc. were not unbiased. Rather he was stating that the right tends to lash out at those institutions as biased because they do not conform to the worldview held by those conservatives.Also, as a former journalist, I can say that you are wrong in one respect to newspapers. Editorial sections are exactly that editorials which means that they are a space for the editorial board or individuals to write into the paper and express their views on issues. Gasp! That’s what an editorial is!Additionally, You mention CNN/MSNBC, Mother Jones and other organisations and you claim that these organisations are inherently biased. What you fail to realise is that you on the right are so inculcated with media that only gives you half of the story that you feel like any other media institution that gives you both sides of the story is inherently pushing the other side and thus is wrong. I will admit though that I will likely not be able to convince you of this, but I thought it would be worth the attempt. August 13, 2018 at 5:23 pm Mr. Salmon,You provided one piece of evidence showing a violent “Antifa” and the best part is the accused in that situation had all charges dropped. There are likely more examples of violence, but as Mr. Ouellette says, it is far more one-sided than you make it appear. On that note, I do agree with you (as I am sure Mr. Ouellette does) that violent actions taken politically are never acceptable. Jordan Sakal says: August 16, 2018 at 12:20 pm Mr. Salmon, First, I direct you to the comment I made to Mr. Collins. It is not that “the media” has “liberal bias” the fact is that conservatives are so attuned to their media diets that it creates an echo chamber of facts that they hold to be self-evident. When conservatives are presented with both sides of a story (or any information which challenges their preconceived notions) it leads them to both figurative and literal streaks of violence. Please see: https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/editorials/2018/08/15/editorial/Kt0NFFonrxqBI6NqqennvL/story.htmlAnd: https://wtop.com/national/2018/07/more-republicans-in-the-news-thats-not-media-bias/And: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2018/08/why-a-free-press-matters/567676/ David A Salmon says: David A Salmon says: August 16, 2018 at 3:20 pm Jordan – so in response to the question of liberal bias in the media, you post one article that discusses the amount of coverage for which party is in power and states itself that it has nothing to do with bias, an opinion piece on freedom of the press which says nothing of bias and another article on freedom of the press (which does not discuss bias) written by self disgraced, hyper liberal Dan Rather who lost his job for publishing lies. It is like you didn’t grasp the concept of bias at all. You then talk about exposure to differing opinions that applies every bit to liberals as it does to conservatives. Bill Louis is correct. There is no purpose engaging either of you, everything is based on opinions (with posts that are opinions and not facts) and feelings. Good luck to both of you. Jordan Sakal says: Terry Francis says: Matt Ouellette says: August 15, 2018 at 7:15 am Proof that the SLC classifies those who disagree as haters or hate group:Focus on the Family and Jsmes DodsonAmerican Family AssociationThe Christian Broadcasting NetworkAll anti Abortion GroupsLiberty UniversityBrighram Young UniversityAny individual or organization that supports hetro marriage onlyThe Sons of Confederate VeteransHobby LobbyThe Southern Baptist ConventionAny individual or group that is against illegal immigrationAny individual or group that voted for or supports President Trump.Basically any person or organization that does not bow or genuflect to the demands of the SPLC are classified as a hater or hate group by this ultra liberal conservative hating group!Meanwhile the secular national media continues to drink the poisonous kool aid of the SPLC with any question because if they do question, they too will be added to the SPLC hate list! Doug Collins says: August 11, 2018 at 10:40 am This article features as it should the courageous stance of the three “downtown” Episcopal churches here in Charlottesville. What it ignores are the many faithful and concerned church members in surrounding Episcopal (and other) churches who have stood up and voiced their belief in and work for a peaceful, inclusive, and loving community here. Charlottesville was invaded last year by hundreds of racist and militant adversaries. The conflict came when local people stood in their way and were attacked. We certainly don’t want that to happen again. Rector Washington, DC August 10, 2018 at 5:03 pm So no comments on Antifa, you actually referred to them as “counter-protestors”, who showed up with clubs with the intention to cause chaos? Noi mention of the incivility that existed at the Red Hen, or any of the other blatant violence directed at people with opposing views? This is why the SJW’s that have taken over the leadership of this church are driving away life time members such as myself. I don’t see love or Jesus’ teachings here, I see an agenda that is purely political. What a shame. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID August 15, 2018 at 10:51 pm Mr. Collins,It is not an assumption I make lightly, as an individual who has published a research study in a communications journal on the topic of social media and media’s influence on political awareness I consider myself a bit of an expert on the matter.What I can attest to is the following based off the research. People on the whole tend to seek out media coverage that will confirm the narratives that they consider “correct.” They exist in a world of confirmation bias. (Additionally, research showed that Fox News was the least trusted and most biased news source on the political spectrum. But that doesn’t fit your narrative does it?) Youth Minister Lorton, VA David F Wayland says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Charlottesville, August 15, 2018 at 8:12 pm Your claims that universities are inherently hostile against conservatives are mostly supported by isolated anecdotes. The data, however, does not support a pattern of bias:https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/3/12/17100496/political-correctness-dataAlso, the mainstream press is not biased against conservatives. While some of the sources you gave as examples are left-leaning (MSNBC, The Nation, Mother Jones), the Washington Post, CNN, and other mainstream sources do their best to remain neutral and include a diversity of opinions in their editorials. Just because the mainstream press doesn’t treat conservatives with kiddie gloves like Fox News doesn’t mean it is hostile to conservatives. That is a right-wing myth. Jordan Sakal says: By David PaulsenPosted Aug 10, 2018 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Matt Ouellette says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Matt Ouellette says: Submit a Press Release August 16, 2018 at 12:42 pm I would argue that the fascist groups who wanted to march in support of hateful ideologies were the real pot-stirrers. If they had decided to stay home, they would not have provoked violent vigilante groups like Antifa. August 14, 2018 at 7:06 am Jordan – The Southern Poverty Law Group is not the arbitrator of anything; they are a political group that routinely tags hate group status on anyone whose politics they disagree with. You and Matt cast your morally superior stones on here on a daily basis. Matt routinely argues that his viewpoints are the only moral positions to take; defending a violent hate group like Antifa is just an example of the danger of self righteousness. It is also an perfect example of progressive Christian thinking where a person will bend basic morality (defending a violent political group) to support a political position. Finally, are you his big brother? You always rush in to defend him anytime anyone dares to disagree with his position. He is a grown man and should be able to defend himself. Jordan Sakal says: Charlottesville Episcopalians join peaceful gatherings marking year after hate groups’ violence Tensions still simmer in Southern university town Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Robbie Johnson says: Comments are closed. August 14, 2018 at 5:55 pm Robbie,They are in fact a top authority on what is classified as a hate group especially given that they do in fact classify varying types of groups or organisations as hate groups on a regular basis. One could say that their experience with the subject makes them an expert in the matter. Press Release Service David A Salmon says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Matt Ouellette says: August 13, 2018 at 7:55 pm Just so I am 100% clear I was merely pointing out that A) a group of leftist fascist thugs such as Antifa were referred to as Counter protestors. B) I was making no moral equivalent I was merely pointing out that the beauty of this country is this simple. The idiot Nazi’s show up with their group of 100 and they chant and do their thing and no one shows up to report or counter protest, let them try to win people on their ideas, which we know full well they will not do. The next day the counter group shows up and explains why that group is all wrong and explains their position. No violence only ideas. Again my point was these idiots were largely unnoticed until Antifa shows up with clubs and knives to “stand up to fascists” and the news breathlessly reports it because let’s face it, they make money on a tragedy. Take away a counter-protest that was there for one purpose only, to violently oppose this group and provoke a confrontation and an idiot does not drive into a crowd, so yes I do think there is cause and effect. And lastly, yes Antifa is on par with other fascist groups when your sole purpose is to violently shut down people whose ideas you disagree with. Rector Collierville, TN Jordan Sakal says: Jordan Sakal says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 August 14, 2018 at 5:33 pm Just thought I would throw it out there. The Southern Law & Poverty Center is viewed by many (mostly liberals) as the #1 authority as to whom as a hate group. August 13, 2018 at 5:58 am I give thanks and send my prayers to your witness in Charlottesville and to others involved in the wwotrk of love and justice. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Jordan Sakal says: Robbie Johnson says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis August 15, 2018 at 12:14 pm I work in Charlottesville less than 5 minutes’ walk from the park which was the center of all the controversy and violence. People who live here go about their day being friendly and sit in the park in the shadow of trees and statues and give their attention to civility, work, and leisure. What citizens here hate are all the camera-ready activists who get in each others’ spaces and then complain. There is no shortage of activists who appear at an instant to stir the pot. Antifa thugs assaulted journalists and the police this past weekend. Like some other activists they want to deny thought unless it conforms to their thought. That’s the big struggle in this city. There are people who want the 1st Amendment for themselves but then want to drown out and go toe to toe with those who oppose their view. For freedom of speech to work we must allow hate to be heard on the street equally to peace, but with neither side using violence or trying to shut down the other. Antifa was the pot-stirrer again, in Charlottesville and they are violent. They want to drown out others. They are facists. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/timothymeads/2018/08/12/antifa-thugs-attack-nbc-reporter-in-charlottesville-n2509140 August 16, 2018 at 9:24 am Mr. Francis – “Hate is Hate”; that is all that needs to be said. We are both saying that the lunatics on both the fringe of right and left wing politics should be condemned without excuse or moral hair splitting. Like their counterparts on the right, they hide their faces behind masks, commit acts of violence against anyone who stands in their way and do everything to shut down opinions of anyone who disagrees. Both sides are gutless moral cowards who use violence (like the Brownshirts) to get their way. Anyone who thinks that Antifa is not interested in spreading their own twisted viewpoint does not know much about history and despite what anyone says, openly embraces their communist roots. Hate is hate.. that is all that need to be said. Both sides should be completely condemned without without reservation. Featured Jobs & Calls August 13, 2018 at 9:31 pm Mr. Salmon,Mr. Ouellette is not splitting hairs to support a hate group. In fact the Southern Poverty Law Center which is by and large the arbiter of who is classified as a hate group does not list in any way shape or form “Antifa” as a hate group. Second off, for allegedly being a “Christian” you seem to think yourself morally superior enough to cast stones when it is not deserved. August 14, 2018 at 7:30 pm The SLPC is itself a hate group!It hates any organization or individual that takes a stand against the policies and views of the SLPC ! Jordan Sakal says: Featured Events August 14, 2018 at 3:40 pm I am not giving Antifa a pass for its violence and attacks on citizens. It should be condemned by Christians of all stripes as a violent vigilante group. However, I still do not think we should equate them with Nazis. Surely you don’t think the primary goal of Antifa (combatting fascism) is equal to the primary goal of fascist groups (promoting the hateful, Satanic ideology of fascism), right? So while I do think Antifa is a dangerous group that Christians should not associate with, I don’t think it’s a hate group. It’s not actively promoting a hateful ideology, but is instead fighting that ideology using immoral tactics. August 16, 2018 at 4:15 pm Mr. Salmon,Thank you for so cleverly ignoring the main thrust of my argument that your source actually had little to do with the argument you were attempting to make. You claimed “liberal bias” when it doesn’t actually exist. Furthermore, Dan Rather (whom I have personally met, who is a delightful chap did not lose his job because he “published lies” as you so put it. Mr. Rather lost his job due to the failings of the producers and his support team around him who are to help him report the news. They gave him a story to report which he trusted had been verified and fact-checked and ran with it, trusting on its integrity as good journalism. As you have shown, it was later proven to be a story that was without merit and as a result reputations were sullied and credibility damaged (but not lost.) Dan Rather still is a journalist of high integrity and still reports the facts. The reality of news media is that the news media isn’t necessarily biased one way or another, rather people have stopped critically thinking and researching and learning for themselves.http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/articles/lazy-thinking-not-political-bias-drives-fake-news/ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Deacon Bernie Jones says: August 11, 2018 at 7:18 pm The Southern Law & Poverty Center is itself a hate group! Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK August 15, 2018 at 10:13 pm Your assumption about why conservatives think it is biased is completely false. Conservatives think it is biased because it has been proven time and again to be biased. I am not going to sit here and list the ways but when press coverage of a President is 97% negative that is bias, plain and simple. You can ignore it if you like but hat just exposes your own biases. August 13, 2018 at 5:51 pm I agree that Antifa is wrong in its tactics of political violence. But I think it is wrong to claim that they are morally equivalent to Nazis and fascists:https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/charlottesville-aftermath-1.4246438 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more