Phish Debuted Ten New Songs At A Benefit Concert, On This Day In 1995

first_imgSetlist: Phish at Lowell Memorial Auditorium, Lowell, MA – 5/16/95Don’t You Want To Go 0:08:24Ha Ha Ha 0:14:05Spock’s Brain 0:15:40Strange Design 0:21:16Reba 0:24:23Theme From the Bottom 0:39:49Hold Your Head Up 0:50:40Lonesome Cowboy Bill 0:55:55Hold Your Head Up 0:58:40Free 0:59:44Glide II 1:08:15You Enjoy Myself 1:12:30Sweet Adeline 1:38:05Sample in a Jar 1:40:10Encore:I’ll Come Running 1:45:55Gloria 1:49:20 Perhaps most infamous for the creation of “Spock’s Brain,” today marks the 21st anniversary of a legendary concert in Phish history. On this day in 1995, the Burlington band performed for a Voters for Choice benefit concert at the Lowell Memorial Auditorium in Lowell, MA. The group was introduced by Gloria Steinem, who promised fans more new music than ever before. Then, the band delivered.What followed was debut after debut – 10 new songs in total – including some beloved originals that have made it in rotation ever since. Songs like “Free” and “Theme From The Bottom,” which would later make it onto Billy Breathes, were featured in the performance. The show also featured the debut of “Strange Design,” and a cover of Velvet Underground’s “Lonesome Cowboy Bill” that would foreshadow the band’s full-album performance of Loaded in 1998.“Ha Ha Ha” got its start at this show, as did an unnamed original that would later be referred to as “Spock’s Brain.” After playing the song, drummer Jon Fishman polled the audience with some alternate title options, including The Plane, The First Single, Israel, and Spock’s Brain. We all know what the audience chose.Other debuts included the traditional “Don’t You Want To Go?,” the original song “Glide II,” Brian Eno’s “I’ll Come Running” and Van Morrison’s “Gloria” as the show finale. Ten debuts in a single show is almost unheard of – not counting the band’s 2013 Halloween performance of the album that would become Fuego. To relive this magic moment, stream the full show below:last_img read more

A Message From BRO on Trail Days

first_img On behalf of BRO… from Blue Ridge Outdoors on Vimeo.The newest member of the Blue Ridge Outdoors team, Travel Editor Jess Daddio, had a rough introduction to her new job: she traveled to Trail Days in Damascus to represent the magazine as part of the BRO Roadshow. A recent graduate of Emory and Henry College and a southwest Virginia native, she is intimately familiar with the region, so Saturday’s tragic accident during the Hikers Parade was especially heart-wrenching for her and for us. We are pulling for the victims involved and hope for a speedy recovery for all in what appears to be purely a combination of bad timing and bad luck. One thing we know for sure is that this supremely unfortunate accident will not stop Trail Days and will not stop anyone from attempting to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail. The trail hiking community will rally around the victims, those involved, and those first responders who reacted quickly and bravely to ensure the damage to life was limited. Thank you to all who lent a hand.Below are some photos from the event both pre- and post- parade Jess sent from the field. center_img last_img read more

As Opioid Epidemic Continues, Steps to Curb It Multiply

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Charles Ornstein ProPublicaThe overdose death toll from opioids, both prescription drugs and heroin, has almost quadrupled since 1999. In 2014 alone, 28,000 people died of opioid overdoses, more than half from prescription drugs.Just last month, public awareness of the opioid epidemic reached a new level when Prince was found dead with prescription narcotics on him and authorities began to investigate their role in his demise. In recent weeks, lawmakers and regulators have moved to augment treatment options for addiction and to require more education for doctors who prescribe opioids. The U.S. House of Representatives is voting on a package of bills this week; the Senate passed its own bill in March.Also in that span, the Los Angeles Times has published an investigation of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster pain pill OxyContin, and CNN held a town hall meeting on the consequences of addiction to narcotics. Dr. David A. Kessler, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, wrote an op-ed in the New York Times, calling the embrace of opioids “one of the biggest mistakes in modern medicine.”Last week, ProPublica added warnings labels to the pages of narcotic drugs in our Prescriber Checkup news app, prompted by indications that some readers are using the tool to find doctors who will prescribe these drugs with few or no questions asked (See our editor’s note).The effectiveness of any of these steps remains to be seen. There is broad consensus on the need for more treatment options, more education, more careful prescribing by doctors. But there’s still much debate about the details—and funding–for each of those steps.What’s clear is that in recent months there has been an increasing emphasis on the role of health providers and the agencies that oversee them to stem access to widely abused prescription drugs:In March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released guidelines on prescribing of opioids for chronic pain, defined as pain that lasts for more than three months (excluding pain related to cancer, end-of-life and palliative care.) The guidelines call on doctors to choose therapies other than opioids as their preferred option; to use the lowest possible doses; and to monitor all patients closely.That same month, the FDA announced tougher warning labels on immediate-release opioids, such as fentanyl, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, to note the “serious risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose and death.”Nonprofit groups and medical experts in April asked the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to remove questions about pain control from a survey of hospital patients’ satisfaction to remove any incentive to overtreat pain. And they asked The Joint Commission, which accredits health facilities, to revise its standards to deemphasize “unnecessary, unhelpful and unsafe pain treatments.” The commission pushed back, saying its standards do no such thing.Just yesterday, Dr. Steven J. Stack, president of the American Medical Association, called on doctors to do more. He encouraged doctors to use their state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program to ensure their patients aren’t shopping for multiple doctors to prescribe them drugs. He called on them to co-prescribe a rescue drug, naloxone, to patients at risk of overdose. And he told them to generally avoid starting opioids for new patients with chronic, non-cancer pain.“As physicians, we are on the front lines of an opioid epidemic that is crippling communities across the country,” Stack wrote in a statement, published on the Huffington Post. “We must accept and embrace our professional responsibility to treat our patients’ pain without worsening the current crisis. These are actions we must take as physicians individually and collectively to do our part to end this epidemic.”ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.last_img read more