AgCredit Announces Joe Leiser Scholarship Winners

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest AgCredit, Agricultural Credit Association, recently announced the recipients of the cooperative’s annual Joe Leiser Memorial Scholarship.Joe Leiser served as the first president and chief executive officer for AgCredit, which is one of northern Ohio’s largest lenders, serving farmers, agribusiness and rural homeowners. Each scholarship recipient received a $2,000.00 for the 2018-2019 school year. This year, all three of the scholar winners are studying at The Ohio State University.Taylor Lutz, from Bucyrus, (Crawford County) is a junior majoring in Agriscience Education with a minor in Production Agriculture.Megan Ritter, from Findlay, (Hancock County) is a senior majoring in Agribusiness and Applied Economics with a minor in Agronomy.Josh Strine, from Caledonia, (Marion County) is a freshman majoring in Animal Science with a minor in Agribusiness.“AgCredit is happy to encourage and reward these hardworking students. Congratulations! We wish the Joe Leiser scholarship winners success throughout their college years — continuing on to their future careers,” said Brian Ricker, President and CEO.Since 1989, AgCredit has given over $100,000 in scholarships.last_img read more

Clarice Patrimonio wins silver in tennis

first_imgTennis, thus, failed to win a gold in the competition and will go home with two silvers and two bronzes.The other silver came from Francis Casey Alcantara and Ruben Gonzales in the men’s doubles last Friday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutKatharina Lehnert and Denise Dy also wound up third place in women’s doubles.Dy and Gonzales settled for bronze in mixed doubles which the country ruled two years ago in Singapore through Dy and Treat Huey. LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses LATEST STORIES Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics PLAY LIST 00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games View comments Anna Clarice Patrimonio of the Philippines competes against Luksika Kumkhum of Thailand in the finals of women’s singles event of the 29th Southeast Asian Games lawn tennis competition Saturday at the National Tennis Center in Kuala Lumpur. Kumkhum prevailed, 6-0, 6-1, to pocket the gold medal. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/SEA GAMES POOLKUALA LUMPUR — Clarice Patrimonio had to settle for silver after running into a solid-steel Luksika Khumkhum of Thailand, 6-0, 6-1, Saturday in the 29th Southeast Asian Games tennis women’s singles competition.The rain-marred finals at Jalan Duta Tennis Complex was a lopsided affair as the FIlipina could not find a way to get through the Thai, who once was ranked 85th in the world and has an Asian Games doubles gold under her belt (2014 Incheon).ADVERTISEMENT Read Next MOST READ Mayweather, McGregor ready to rumble in much-hyped fight SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chieflast_img read more

Sex romps and drugs spiced Proteas cricket

first_imgHerschelle Gibbs, who underwent rehab for alcohol abuse last year, outside the Cape Town Magistrate’s Court in 2009 after he was charged with drink driving.A no-holds-barred autobiography by South African batsman Herschelle Gibbs has revealed the dark side of Proteas cricket, providing graphic details of sexual orgies, marijuana sessions and a senior coterie dominating the team.Aptly called To The Point if only for being so direct in recording details of sexual encounters in which he and other players took part, Gibbs has perhaps realised that candour can be explosive, just like his batting in his heydays.The description of his team’s tours Down Under as shopping expeditions for “eager young Aussie lasses” is a case in point. He also relates the experience of a hotel room orgy involving three girls.”Two beds, two cricketers and three women. One of them wasn’t all that keen, though; she just lay on the bed. Which was fine — there was enough for everyone. The other two girls, however, more than made a go of it,” he writes. Extracts of the book were published by Johannesburg based The Sunday Times.”I got the ball rolling, but then I noticed that my mate was feeling a little left out. Now he’s lying on the other bed, so, big-hearted chap that I am, I say, ‘Well, you can’t leave my mate all alone there.’ And fortunately one of them was only too happy to transfer ship…. They came hunting in packs, and if they liked what they saw, you were in for the ride of your life,” he reveals.advertisementThe disclosures came on a day when South Africa were involved in a One-Day International against Pakistan in Dubai. The book, which releases on Monday, apart from highlighting the sexual exploits of the batsman who was often in trouble for late night binges and drunken driving, says leading players in smoking pot in the West Indies.”Some people aren’t going to like this chapter, but I’ve always believed you have to call it like you see it,” writes Gibbs in the book, the excerpts of which were published in The Sunday Times. Gibbs recalled his encounter with a girl on her way to a matric dance — a formal dance for high school students. “I spotted one particularly gorgeous girl, obviously dressed to the nines, walking around the hotel lobby. After a few drinks and a few words, she came upstairs with me to my room and gave me a little dance of another kind. She then left and went back to the dance proper,” recalls Gibbs, who has played in three World Cups for South Africa and is contracted to the Proteas until next April.Gibbs also wrote about how he came across a stripper during one of South Africa’s warm-up games on the 1997-98 Australia tour.Gibbs and some of his teammates noticed a “pretty girl” and asked her to join them that evening. They started drinking and she mentioned she was a stripper. “Things loosened up a lot more after that. Various items of clothing were removed in an eyebrow-raising kind of way, and one thing invariably led to another.” Gibbs also admitted that his “most expensive shag” set him back by 5000 Rand (about Rs 31,750) in a fine for poor performance on the field the next day.The autobiography of Gibbs, who has been out of the team for quite some time now, is likely to rock the cricket world and could also incur the ire of South African players after he wrote how the Proteas are dominated by a “clique” of senior players.He said even former coach Mickey Arthur had to bow to them. “The team has been criticised for being run by a group of senior players — captain Graeme Smith, Jacques Kallis, Mark Boucher and, more recently, AB de Villiers — and this inner circle splits the team in two and makes any chance of developing true team spirit among the Proteas impossible. “Simply put, without Graeme’s backing, Mickey didn’t have much influence over the guys. In the end, Graeme was simply too powerful,” he writes.The hard-hitting opener also revealed how the team never regained its spirit after former captain Hansie Cronje’s admission to match fixing which resulted in a life ban.”Things were never the same … I sympathised with Shaun Pollock — he had a tough time filling Hansie’s shoes and gluing the team back together. But the Proteas never had that same togetherness under Polly. He never socialised with the boys too much.advertisement”I think if we’re honest with ourselves … we’ve got to admit that the Proteas have underachieved in international cricket over the past decade.” But despite Cronje’s association in match fixing, Gibbs claims: “the cloud that hangs over his legacy, I can tell you that I’ve never played with anyone who possessed such a die-hard attitude to winning”. In the book, Gibbs discusses his failed marriage and the rehabilitation stint that he underwent.His marriage to Tenielle Povey ended in 2008 after his drunken ways got him into trouble far too often. “As you now know, I’ve managed to land myself in the kak with alarming regularity right from the start of my cricket career. A stint in rehab for alcohol abuse and a messy divorce would be more than enough controversy for most professional athletes, but, with me, that wasn’t the half of it.”We were physically fighting while I was driving … I managed to pull some of her hair out. As explosive as my batting can be, it hasn’t quite matched the pyrotechnics of my life off the field.” There have been detailed descriptions of how some of his teammates flew out waitresses from the infamous Port Elizabeth restaurant The Ranch to join them on tour and the night he spent with two “hotties” with a reputation for making their way through cricketing nations.last_img read more