Union Bank of Nigeria Plc (UBN.ng) Q32017 Interim Report

first_imgUnion Bank of Nigeria Plc (UBN.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2017 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Union Bank of Nigeria Plc (UBN.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Union Bank of Nigeria Plc (UBN.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Union Bank of Nigeria Plc (UBN.ng)  2017 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileUnion Bank of Nigeria Plc is a financial services institution in Nigeria providing banking products and services for individuals, small and medium-sized enterprises and corporations. The company also has business interests in the United Kingdom. The company provides a full-service offering ranging from transactional accounts, savings accounts and fixed deposits to personal and corporate loans, overdrafts and online and mobile banking services. Union Bank of Nigeria Plc also offers credit solutions which includes asset finance, corporate lending, debit capital finance, supplier finance, working capital finance and project finance as well as investment management services and trade finance solutions. The latter includes import and export letters of credit, bonds and guarantees and import and export bills of collection. Union Bank of Nigeria Plc offers treasury solutions, money market instruments, debt market services, cash management services and fixed term deposits. Founded in 2017, the company is a subsidiary of Union Global Partners Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Union Bank of Nigeria Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Task force for church structural reform issues statement

first_img Bishop Andrew Gerales Gentry says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Rector Albany, NY Jim Frodge says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET February 19, 2013 at 9:11 am Totally correct! This is not quite what the media would find useful — yet. Accredited to 10 General Conventions and 2 Lambeths, this sounds as if it might be Super Indaba — simply REACT and let the experts do the work. Disappointing. Rev. Dr. John Conrad says: Comments (9) February 18, 2013 at 8:15 pm This says nothing more than there was a meeting…in three languages. Another meeting.Lord, have mercy!JC+ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 February 18, 2013 at 4:55 pm We have a great opportunity to be nimble in the 21st century. New opportunities deserve better than the structures of the past that now can be counter productive. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Allen Hinman says: February 19, 2013 at 3:58 am what wonderful news. I would like to share my 55 years of insights, thoughts about a way forward and what the children need to grow in love and dedication to a futrue church worthy of participation. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET February 19, 2013 at 7:53 pm This simply reports that a committee met and a meeting was held. Nothing new and so typically Episcopalian as one writer has noted “The Episcopal Church continues to debate itself into irrelevancy”. Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Episcopal Church task force for church structural reform has issued a statement following the group’s inaugural meeting Feb. 14-16.The following is the statement in English and French below. The Spanish version is here.At the 77th General Convention, the Holy Spirit called The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself and how it can more deeply live into its identity in our rapidly changing world. The church responded to this call by unanimously adopting Resolution C095 in both houses, which created and commissioned this task force. On February 14, the appointed task force enthusiastically convened to begin our work. In our three days of discussion, prayer, and worship together, we have been energized by the diversity of talents, cultures, and life experiences present at the table, and we have been inspired by our shared love for the church and our passion for the creative work before us.We organized ourselves for business, agreeing on a leadership team consisting of two conveners, Dr. Catherine George and the Rev. Canon Craig Loya, and four initial working group leaders, Julia Ayala Harris, Margaret Shannon, the Rev. Leng Lim, and the Rev. Joseph Chambers. A secretary and two chaplains will be appointed prior to our next gathering. At this first meeting, we were also joined by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Jennings, and Executive Officer of General Convention the Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe, who offered us their valuable insights and made us aware of resources that will assist us in our work.We have started the process of developing an engagement strategy that will enable us to live into our commitment to transparency while preserving the sanctity of holy conversation. We further aim not only to provide a window into our work, but to provoke a parallel process of dialogue around questions of identity, structure, and culture at all levels of the church. To facilitate that discernment, we plan to offer a range of opportunities to obtain input and feedback from all corners of the church, and we urge all members to reflect prayerfully alongside us and to offer their insights and wisdom. These opportunities will be unveiled in the coming weeks.Drawing on language from Resolution C095, we have chosen to call ourselves the Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church: structures, governance, and administration (TREC). We hope that this conveys a sense of our work’s scope, as well as our desire to take a journey with the whole church as we discover how we are being called to be the body of Christ in the world.May the Holy Spirit continue to bless and guide the church through this time of change and new life.Lors la 77e Convention générale, le Saint-Esprit a appelé à l’Eglise Episcopale de se ré-imaginer et [penser] comment elle peut vivre plus profondément dans son identité dans notre monde de changements rapides. L’église a répondu à cet appel par l’adoption unanime de la Résolution C095 dans chaque chambre, qui a créé et commandé ce groupe de travail. Au 14 février, le groupe de travail nommé s’est réuni avec enthousiasme afin de commencer notre travail. Pendant nos trois journées de discussion, de prière, et de culte ensemble, nous avons été stimulés par la diversité de dons, de cultures, et d’experiences de vie présente à la table et nous avons été inspirés par notre amour partagé pour l’église et notre passion pour le travail créatif qui nous fait face.Nous nous sommes organisés pour le travail, nous nous sommes mis d’accord sur une structure de direction composée de deux organisateurs (Dr Katherine George et le Révérend Canon Craig Loya), quatre chefs de groupe de travail (Mme Julia Ayala Hariss, Mme Margaret Shannon, le Révérend Long Lim, et le Révérend Joseph Chambers). L’équipe de direction nommera un secrétaire et deux aumôniers avant notre prochaine rencontre. A cette première réunion, l’Evêque Présidente Katharine Jefferts Schori et la Présidente de la Chambre des Député(e)s Gay Jennings et le Directeur de la Convention générale Michael Barlowe nous ont joints et ils nous ont offert leurs aperçus précieux et ils nous ont rendus conscientes des ressources qui nous aideront dans notre tâche.Nous avons commencé le processus de dévelopement d’une stratégie d’engagement qui nous permettra à vivre dans notre promesse à la transparence tout en gardant la sanctité de la conversation sainte. En outre, nous voulons non seulement donner un aperçu de notre travail, mais aussi provoquer un processus parallèle de dialogue autour des questions d’identité, de structure et de culture à tous les niveaux de l’église. Afin de faciliter ce discernement, nous projetons d’offrir toute une gamme d’opportunités afin de recevoir des commentaires et des réactions de tous les coins de l’église et nous exhortons à tous et toutes les membres de réfléchir en prière à côté de nous et d’offrir leurs aperçus et leur sagesse. Ces opportunités se dévoileront dans les prochaines semaines.En nous appuyant sur la langue de la Résolution C095, nous avons choisi de nous appeler le Groupe de travail de ré-imaginer l’Eglise Episcopale: les structures, le gouvernement et l’administration (TREC, Task force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church, en anglais). Nous espérons que ceci transmet le sens de la portée de notre travail aussi bien que notre désir d’entreprendre un voyage avec toute l’église tandis que nous découvrons comment nous sommes appelé(e)s à être le corps du Christ dans le monde.Que le Saint-Esprit continue à bénir et guider l’église à travers de ce moment de changement et de nouvelle vie. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Richard Jordan says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention 2012, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tony Lauria says: Comments are closed. February 18, 2013 at 8:56 pm Never has so much been said by so few for so many! They have agreed to talk, to listen, to be very inclusive, and to act at some future point in such a way as not to disturb anyone. Congress could have not said it better! It reminds me of the Prime Minister’s adviser on the British sitcom “Yes Minister”. If he were giving the statement and with apologies to the writer of the sitcom it would go something like this “we have agreed that to agree is laudable whilst agreeing that to disagree is also agreeable and an essentially essential part of the holy conversation we shall have as we listen to the each other listen. In so doing we will accomplish that which is accomplishable given the agreed to agreements within the context of agreeable differences that are relevant and noteworthy of the relevant parties relative to those pertinent matters pertaining to that which is relevant”! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel February 19, 2013 at 9:11 am This post says it all. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Task force for church structural reform issues statement Submit a Press Release Father Les Singleton says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 General Convention, Structure Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN February 21, 2013 at 2:32 pm Agree that more “meat” will be needed in the future. Rector Washington, DC Richard Jordan says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Feb 18, 2013 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kimberly Clark says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 19, 2013 at 5:11 pm They should have to pay for their own paper.last_img read more

Church sees imperative role in racial justice, reconciliation

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Racial Justice & Reconciliation Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Morris says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (9) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Christopher L. Webber says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 21, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group August 22, 2014 at 10:28 am I truly believe that the Episcopal Church is in a unique position here. The church’s doctrine of “Inclusiveness” is truly the “Good News”. Our openess to dialog and conversation will set the bar and will allow for open and thoughtful communication. Blessings! Charlie + Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY August 21, 2014 at 6:15 pm The article speaks of an “all-white police force” in Ferguson. All other news reports I have seen speak of 2 or 2 black officers on a 53-man force. It doesn’t help resolve the issue to provide inaccurate information. Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA John C. Kimbrough says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Hope Boyd says: Christopher L. Webber says: August 26, 2014 at 2:33 pm Just because there is an incident between two people of different races does not mean that racism was involved, jumping to that conclusion without any evidence is incredibly harmful to all parties involved.two weeks ago there was a shooting in Salt Lake City by a black officer against an unarmed white youth, should we assume that the black officer is a racist and executed this kid because he is white. So far no Justice Dept., no riots, no media, no looting, no calls for officer to be executed or immediately being imprisoned without a trial, and no sermons on this shooting; apparently this shooting doesn’t fit the agenda.Sadly there are too many of our black youths dying in our streets, more sadly 91% of those deaths are caused by other black youths, to pretend they are being gunned down by the police is absurd, dishonest and harmful, too everyone involved. When we and leaders of the black community tell black kids that the police don’t like you because they are racist, we wonder why more black youths don’t want to join police dept.Maybe we should start judging people by the content of their character, not by the color of their skin January 9, 2015 at 9:58 pm We are all very imperfect people and it can be hard to know what is the best or right way to handle things…….I think if we have a good understanding of the teachings in The Bible and have made a strong connection with God and our fellow man, we will do the right thing in our lives and regarding the lives of others and how we act, react and interact with and to them regardless of our color, ethnicity, nationality, etc. Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Press Release Service Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York August 22, 2014 at 12:42 pm How refreshing to read about a Christian church that is embracing the teachings of Jesus without the usual populist, economic, and judgemental overlay that plagues so many religious organizations. Kudos to the Episcopal Church organization! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 21, 2014 at 7:09 pm This whole event has raised a multitude of issues, and certainly of feelings. I visited Ferguson and the very location where Michael Brown was killed, a few days ago. Talking with several in that neighborhood, I was impressed with the sense of calm, as well as the spirit of generosity and helpfulness they had toward me–I had needed directions several times! I have been closely following news reports daily, and nightly. One thing we need to do, other than realizing that this is a result in great part to systemic prejudice, discrimination, and injustice, is to take “a holy time” to wait for the results of ALL the facts to come out, through the judicial system, for we have local and federal attorneys, prosecutors, and so forth that will be gathering the facts, evidence and the like for many days ahead. And we need to state the facts we know so far with accuracy. Even this piece states that the Ferguson police force is all white. Assuredly only 3 of 53 are black, but that’s still SOME difference right there so far as the facts are concerned. We need to know that the vast majority, some 150 of 156 or so, of those arrested for violent acts in all the protest events so far were outsiders, from beyond the borders of the city of Ferguson, some arriving here from other states and cities (like New York, Chicago, and San Diego). They have apparently come here just to foment trouble, some of it violent. This is all a very confusing and complex thing, so no one should jump to conclusions about exactly what happened, is occurring, and why, in this most sad and tragic episode.One of the most important things we should do as Episcopalians going forward is work to integrate our congregations, and do much in the way of growing to understand and learn from others within them, in terms of different races. We did both in my last church that I served for 24 years, prior to retirement. Before much of Chester Hine’s good Dismantling Racism work, we had a series of most helpful sessions, with a lay person and myself trained beforehand as facilitators by a Jewish-Christian group training many for this interracial program. My church, by the way, was all white when I went there (in the general area of North St. Louis County in which Ferguson is located, a bit farther way from the City of St. Louis). When I left, it was about 50 percent white and the same percentage black. Some were Nigerians. This was not hard to do, since we were located in a very bi-racial area of the county. Leadership and a strong sense of mission and outreach came from both races.I have learned and come to understand how just knowing people, worshiping with them, and being friends can make such a difference, in this area of sometimes great trouble and even enmity in our society. And as well this is true in differences and prejudice and injustice in the area of sexual orientation, since I’ve been for over 14 years in a parish that has a good percentage of LGBT folks as members, with a partnered gay man as rector. It is on he local level of church membership and involvement, worship , witness and mission and ministry where these crucial matters in our society will be changed for the better, I now, thankfully, know by personal experience. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Dan Tootle says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: This story has been updated. Though the Ferguson police department is predominantly white, it is not all-white as previously stated. While the fatal police shooting of an unarmed African-American teenager continued to spark protests in Ferguson, Missouri, Episcopalians throughout the U.S. were grappling with a tough reality that it could have happened just about anywhere and with a difficult question: what should the church be doing about it?Despite the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown and its violent aftermath the hope “is that it will finally be the wakeup call we need in this country to address this issue,” Bishop Stacy Sauls, Episcopal Church chief operating officer, told ENS. “Because, in my opinion, race relations in the United States have been getting worse, not better.”Festering tensions between the predominantly white Ferguson police department and the African-American community erupted in violence after officer Darren Wilson fatally shot 18-year-old Brown. Conflicting eyewitness reports followed and an independent autopsy revealed Brown had been shot six times. Ferguson police subsequently identified Brown as a robbery suspect.Regardless, local clergy and residents decried the level of police violence directed against the predominantly African-American community.Sauls said Christian churches sparked the civil rights movement “and I think we’re seeing a very strong call for us to be involved again. One thing we can do, is bring people together to talk, not only on a local level or a regional level, but for a national conversation. That can have a very positive impact.”Similarly, in an Aug. 20 statement young adult members of the Union of Black Episcopalians (UBE) cited, among other things, “the subculture of prejudice against black people resulting in headline after headline of another American lying dead in neighborhood streets.”The statement called upon UBE chapters across the country to help carry the message “so that the prophetic voice of the Episcopal Church resounds in speaking against the legacy of institutionalized oppression in the United States and across our world.”Carrying the message: prophetic voicesChester Hines began serving as a trainer at anti-racism workshops in the Diocese of Missouri by choice, and because of circumstance.“I grew up in segregated St. Louis. It doesn’t matter what institution you identify in St. Louis they have always – in my experience – been segregated, even after the federal Civil Rights legislation of 1964,” said Hines, 67, an auditor and former teacher who serves in a field placement assignment at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Creve Coeur, as part of the diocesan ordination process.Hines said that, not only was he not surprised that racial tensions erupted in nearby Ferguson after Brown’s shooting, “I was surprised it hadn’t happened sooner and in more places.”He passed on his own life lessons to twin sons, Christian and Christopher, as they came of age, in the interest of preservation, he said. “I educated my children to understand and know about segregation, race and racism, that it existed in St. Louis,” he said. “I also told them how it manifested itself.“I taught them as they became 10 years of age, that they would be encountered by the police, by security when they went to the mall with their friends, and they had white friends. I taught them the lessons that I knew they were going to have to learn in order to be out in the community because these were the lessons I had to learn and it hadn’t changed,” he said.“I told them what was going to happen but, more importantly I told them, here is your response: You engage the policeman with respect and regard, yes sir, no sir. You give your name. You follow his directions, even if you have to be arrested.“Because, here’s what’s at risk: if you aggravate or in some way convey to that policeman that you’re challenging him, he’s going to harm you in some physical way or bust your head and once your head is busted or you’re shot up, it can’t be fixed.“However, it can be fixed if you’re taken to the jailhouse, because I can come and get you from there. But a physical confrontation, I can’t do anything about.”Now that both sons are 31 and attorneys, he says, “Every day I wake up and say ‘Amen.’”‘Race is so hard to talk about’ – so listenThe Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, was “trying to listen to folks on the ground” in Ferguson and counseling others to do likewise.He also invited cathedral parishioners, following the Aug. 17 main Sunday service, to spend time together, with no judgment, no comments, no arguing, just plain listening to each other. “There were tears, anger, confusion, a wide variety of feelings were represented but there was just this holy space and I realized it was grace,” he said.“There are people who’ve said ‘I don’t have any place to say this. We are afraid of talking about race; afraid we will say the wrong thing. We need a place where we can stumble.“This is something we can do as a church; provide that safe space, to talk about race, because race is so hard to talk about,” he said. “But, I told them all, if you’re not talking, don’t be thinking about what you’re going to say next, just listen.”The Rev. Eric H. F. Law, an Episcopal priest and founder of the Los Angeles-based Kaleidoscope Institute, which offers leadership development and diversity training in multicultural and changing environments agreed “the first step has to be listening to the historically powerless folks.“The big question to ask is, do you want to continue to have these sporadic explosions or do you really want to find a way to engage people so you have real relationships?” said Law, who helped to coordinate reconciliation efforts after the 1992 Los Angeles riots.“The bottom line is, do we have real friendships across racial lines in this country, and can our church facilitate that and not in a superficial way but in a way that we can really attempt to understand each other?”Sauls said that after a Florida jury found neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman not guilty in July 2013 in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, the Episcopal Church began working toward creating for the first time a missioner for racial reconciliation. In June 2014, Heidi Kim was appointed to that position and Charles Wynder was named the Episcopal Church missioner for social justice and advocacy.“I really do believe that if we take seriously this notion that we are all members of the Body of Christ, then we have to behave differently toward one another. The first step is listening to people that think completely differently than you do,” said Kim. In her new role, she is responsible for facilitating the establishment and growth of networks in the church to confront the structural issues of racism in the church and society. Wynder is responsible for engaging Episcopalians in building, resourcing and empowering advocacy movements and networks for social justice at a local and community level.“There was an incident in New York this summer,” said Sauls, referring to the chokehold death of Eric Garner, an African-American man, by New York City police officers, “and now the Michael Brown case, so it’s not an uncommon occurrence.”“Unfortunately,” he said, “this is one of the saddest statements I can make, that we all knew this day would come again.”The Interfaith Center of New York on Aug. 21 welcomed New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s outreach to religious leaders as a way to “heal and deepen the relationship between police and community” in the wake of Garner’s death. “We applaud senior religious leaders for coming together for dialogue at this critical moment,” the statement said, recognizing the crucial role that grassroots faith leaders play “in maintaining peaceful co-existence in their neighborhoods.”Anti-racism training; becoming the beloved communityFor Hines and others who lead anti-racism trainings across the church, resources include the history of the Episcopal Church; the House of Bishops 1994 pastoral letter on the sin of racism; General Convention resolutions on the subject, and some basic definitions.“We talk about the history of the Episcopal Church, and it’s mixed,” Hines said. “We had priests and leadership in the Episcopal Church that were slave owners and members of the Ku Klux Klan.”Henry Shaw, for example, was a wealthy local landowner and philanthropist “who only in the recent past did we recognize was one of the largest slave owners in St. Louis,” Hines says. “Much of the wealth he left to the Episcopal Church came as a result of the slaves he owned.”Agreement on definitions of words like prejudice, discrimination, bigotry also “get us to a point where we talk to each other and can understand hopefully what the other person is saying,” he said.In Atlanta, a name change, from the diocesan antiracism commission to the “Beloved Community Commission for Dismantling Racism” shifted participants to an understanding that “we need to dismantle racism as a part of our spiritual formation and not just so we can check off the box to be on the vestry and be a priest,” said Catherine Meeks, 68, a retired college professor and commission member.“We’ve gone from a lot of open hostility toward our training to having people invite us now to come to their individual parishes,” said Meeks, a member of St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church in Morrow, Georgia, near Atlanta.Celebrating Holy Communion at the start of sessions also “focused the whole day around the umbrella that this is who we are as family; this is the work we have to do to help our family get well.”The daughter of an Arkansas sharecropper and schoolteacher mother “we were really poor,” Meeks recalled. “We were victims, in many ways, of racism. I saw my father very wounded by that and it’s why I’ve been trying so adamantly to change it,” she said.“I tried really hard not to pass on a lot of the fear and rage that my father had to my two sons,” she added. “And I’ve really had to work hard to overcome some of the fear.“I tried very hard to raise my children to feel they had a place in the world and could be independent people, but with the realization they’re black in America. The systems here are not designed for the benefit of people of color,” she said.It means, she said, living a dualistic existence. “You believe you’re a child of God and that God cares for you and you have a place in the world and you will get the blessings that are yours to have. But, you live in a land where there are a lot of systems designed to keep that from happening, and you have to live in the reality of that.”Hope: ‘in the church we have a chance’Sauls said that follow-ups are in the planning stages for groundbreaking events like the Nov. 2013 Episcopal Church’s “Fifty Years Later: the State of Race in America” in Jackson, Mississippi, and an Oct. 2008 service of repentance at the historic African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia.He said the Episcopal Church’s Office of Justice and Advocacy Ministries is compiling resources for communities of faith “to begin conversations. We’re beginning to start to bring leaders across the church together to continue the conversation and to build on the work we did last November” in Jackson.Kinman said that he had received offers from colleagues across the country, to come to Ferguson to join protests.“I’m telling people that, wherever you are in this country, if you really want to help, then use this moment of opportunity and gather your congregation, your people, and ask the question, why do you think this is happening?” he said.“Do some education about race and class, power and privilege. Ask the questions: who in your community is Michael Brown? Who in your community would be those folks on the streets of Ferguson right now? What is their experience of being black or brown in your community?”Meeks agreed. “This situation in Ferguson just highlights that we’ve been trying to pretend we’re at some place we’re not. It could be anywhere in the country, and we know this. Ferguson is just one little tip of the iceberg. We really need to pay attention.”But there is much cause for hope, especially within the church, she said.“My hope lies in the fact that I believe in the church we have a chance. Celebrating Holy Communion is so important because it reminds us that we’re committed to something bigger than ourselves. I just believe the church is the place where we can develop real dialogue, real trust and model a different way to be with one another,” she added.“We’ve got a long way to go to get there, but I think we stand a chance if we are willing to be open to what we say we believe.”Hines said he contradicted a participant at an antiracism training he led last week in Sikeston, who told him real change seemed impossible.“My hope is eternal but change is very slow, he said. “I reminded him that, prior to 1964 and the Civil Rights legislation, I could not have come to Sikeston and stayed anyplace but with a relative. Change is possible if we agree it is and move forward in that direction.”He added: “I think of this work as necessary and vital to the salvation of the Episcopal Church. We look at our history and then we look at our current events and then we identify for ourselves what do we want to look like 10 years from now.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Paul Heet says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA August 23, 2014 at 12:47 am This article impressed me in the beginning statements. My heart sinks knowing that we refuse to deal with black on black crime, black on white crime, and also the part the use of drugs affects the miserable situation we are in today. We’ve learned over and over again that there are issues that are the root causes of our dilemma. Note who buys the drugs funding our devastation: Hollywood’s top guys and gals, major league players, and now we know people in and aspiring for national leadership up to and including the White House, many people who attend church and The Episcopal Church no less. We’ve got to control our appetites for “high” and set boundaries so our lives are worth imaging by all we come in touch with before we can call or enlist others to do so too. The Body of Christ is not every living soul on the earth. Try telling that to ISIS or HAMAS or AL QUEDA or Secularist or Atheist or avowed Marxist and Communist. Understand that the Body of Christ must be THE Body of Christ and not a bunch of folks looking for a Woodstock experience. Jesus is and will remain the answer to healthy boundaries and objective goals that changes hearts and lives towards wholeness, LOVE, respect, community, and the ability to love all those that reject the Body of Christ but whom Jesus is bidding come live THE life of Christ sans drugs and other addictions who’s cost to buy bring the necessary food chain into play killing that we’ve been responsible to go share life abundant with daily. My family, intimate and larger, is bi-racial. We live in peace and love allowing us to speak truth to one another. Race will never be the real issue. The real issue: the heart, the soul, the mind, and our deeds governed by the strength of the HOLY SPIRT whose gift to us is to reveal the LORDSHIP OF JESUS! God bless everyone seeking to be an instrument of His peace! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 22, 2014 at 10:46 am I wasn’t suggesting that 2-3 black officers was wonderful – it’s dreadful – but just that getting the facts straight is a pretty basic prerequisite of constructive debate. Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 22, 2014 at 8:51 am Hopefully IF a more reasonable racial balance can be achieved within the Ferguson police force, then the seemingly prevalent attitude within the present force members of being reactive and repressive toward the large African-American population can be moved to one of being protective and of service. Disarming the Ferguson Police “militia” is going to be as important as transforming the police/citizen relationship to one of mutual respect and trust. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Charles C. Warwick says: Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ George Mims says: Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Church sees imperative role in racial justice, reconciliation Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

International consultation concludes with renewed climate justice commitment

first_imgInternational consultation concludes with renewed climate justice commitment Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Environment & Climate Change Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Gavin Drake Posted Jul 14, 2016 Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans from around the world have made a new commitment to fight for climate justice. The commitment was made at the conclusion of an international consultation in Fiji organised by the Anglican mission agency United Society.The society’s global relations director, Rachel Parry, said that “While affirming the current direction and areas of mission with which the United Society is engaging around the world, this consultation allowed us to focus more deeply on mission priorities in the different contexts from which delegates came, and highlighted some particular areas on which we will endeavour to focus in the coming three years.“The next few months will see these priorities sharpened and begin to be shaped into practical responses and shared areas of collaboration.”Anglicans from 19 provinces were represented at the consultation, to “understood more about the need to redouble their efforts to engage with climate justice,” the United Society said. Fiji was chosen as the host venue because it is experiencing severe consequences of global warming – some 676 villages in the country are at risk of flooding due to rising sea levels.The Church of England’s Bishop of Lincoln, Christopher Lowson, said that the consultation had taught him “the connection between man, God and the environment.”“These are things that I knew with my head, but now I understand them more with my heart because of being in this context and meeting people from this part of the world,” he said. “[I’m] understanding for the first time the real implications of climate change upon real people’s lives.“I’m clear that it’s something we have to address creatively and imaginatively. We’ve got to bend our backs to do something to meet our challenges. And I hope that people across the world within the Anglican Communion and in the Diocese of Lincoln can work hard to plan and work to try to play our part in reducing global warming.”The Archbishop of the West Indies, Bishop of Barbados John Holder, commented: “We realise that we are all connected in this world. We all face the same problems in terms of climate [and] in terms of human abuse. And I think what we’ve done in this gathering is to commit ourselves to make [the United Society] stronger and to make our world and our church far better.”The host of the consultation, Winston Halapua, the Bishop of Polynesia and one of three Archbishops of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia, described the consultation as “historic”, adding: “In the last few days, issues were brought forward from all the different contexts.“We shared them, and in the midst of them we tried to find God’s will; where is Jesus in our whole engagement in God’s mission? It’s so wonderful as we are here as members of the Anglican Communion. . .“We are no longer the same people as when we started. When we gather together in Christ, we move together. When leave this place, we are renewed people for the mission of God.”Rachel Parry said that the consultation participants “all learned a great deal about the far-reaching and wide-ranging impacts of climate change. The church is ideally placed to help raise awareness because it is involved in education and community at all levels.“The consultation emphasised sharing from different contexts, so during the week we heard about the huge challenges facing Christians in many regions. This developed our mutual understanding about a number of issues, which is vital if we are to work together more effectively as a global church in jointly tackling related issues of justice. . .“Delegates agreed there was a particular need to encourage children to acquire an affinity with the environment, as well as an opportunity for the church to help communities learn about land management to mitigate against the destructive impact of climate change.” New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Apopka Burglary Report

first_img3/25/2019 at 7:46 am VEHICLE 1000 BLOCK SEBURN RD  LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Anatomy of Fear 3/22/2019 at 8:23 amRESIDENTIAL 500 BLOCK LAKE BRIDGE LN  Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 DATE/TIME TYPE LOCATION  Apopka Police Department Burglary Report: Week Ending March 25thThe Apopka Burglary Report for the week ending March 25th shows six burglaries reported in the city of Apopka.Chief Michael McKinley of the Apopka Police Department tells us that many vehicle burglaries could have been prevented if everyone remembers to do just two things:Remove all valuables from your vehicleLock your car doorsThe breakdown of the burglaries reported to the Apopka Police Department last week:3 – Business1 – Residential2 – VehicleHere is a list of the burglaries, along with their date, time, type, and location:center_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 3/25/2019 at 2:15 pmBUSINESS 1700 BLOCK S ORANGE BLOSSOM TRL  Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 3/22/2019 at 12:11 pm VEHICLE 500 BLOCK S ORANGE BLOSSOM TRL  3/24/2019 at 2:59 pm BUSINESS 1200 BLOCK ROCK SPRINGS RD  3/23/2019 at 5:53 amBUSINESS 2600 BLOCK E SEMORAN BLVD  TAGSApopka Burglary ReportApopka Police DepartmentBusiness Burglary ReportResidential Burglary ReportVehicle Burglary Report Previous articleWhat does the Mueller Report mean for the 2020 election? Let’s Talk About ItNext articleApopka Art and Foliage Festival coming in April Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

House TR / Salworks

first_imgArchDaily Architects: Salworks Area Area of this architecture project Lead Architects: “COPY” Houses 2019 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/927319/house-tr-salworks Clipboard Save this picture!Cortesia de Salworks+ 25Curated by Matheus Pereira Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/927319/house-tr-salworks Clipboard CopyHouses•Mosteiros, Portugal “COPY”center_img Project Team:Tiago VenturaEngineering:TECNICOUTOCity:MosteirosCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!Cortesia de SalworksRecommended ProductsWoodEGGERLaminatesWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeWindowsSky-FrameRetractable Insect Screen – Sky-Frame FlyText description provided by the architects. The renovation project of this ruined building cornering a small block located in a fishing village aimed at being concise and economical while maintaining the local archetypal features and scale. The very small program reorganized the interior space so as to enable the entrance of natural light in all spaces and added a patio to the roof overlooking the sea and the bordering street to the west. Save this picture!Cortesia de SalworksSave this picture!Save this picture!Cortesia de SalworksThe original sizes of the doors and windows in the west façade, the only one that is entirely clear, were maintained. The lack of interior space dictated a program characterized by very simple solutions where most of the exposed white-painted wood structure was maintained. Only one color was used in the bathroom in order to promote the entrance of zenithal light.Save this picture!Cortesia de SalworksA uniform white exterior painting that extends to the roof conveys unity and a sense of essentiality.Save this picture!Cortesia de SalworksProject gallerySee allShow lessUrban Restoration of Los Bajos Park / EMACSelected ProjectsPanda House Observation Center / BIGSelected Projects Share Year:  Portugal CopyAbout this officeSalworksOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesPortugalPublished on November 01, 2019Cite: “House TR / Salworks” [Casa TR / Salworks] 01 Nov 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisPatinated Copper: Nordic Green/Blue/Turquoise/SpecialMetal PanelsDri-DesignMetal Panels – CopperIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsExterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsPure + FreeFormCustom Metal Cladding – Legacy Fund 1 BuildingWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodWood Fiber Partition Walls – ValchromatDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaSkylightsFAKROEnergy-efficient roof window FTT ThermoToilets / BidetsBritexToilets – Accessible Centurion PanMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream House TR / SalworksSave this projectSaveHouse TR / Salworks Rui Sabino de Sousa, João Braga Area:  89 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects House TR / Salworkslast_img read more

Boston school bus drivers ride the bus to WW conference

first_imgOn Nov. 7, Team Solidarity — the Voice of United School Bus Union Workers — will send a busload of activist leaders from United Steelworkers Local 8751 and supporters in Boston to participate in the Workers World Party National Conference in New York City. At its October membership meeting, Local 8751 voted to pay part of the cost of the bus, acknowledging the support Workers World has given to the bus drivers for decades. “Workers World is doing a good job altogether,” said President Andre François, one of the four union leaders fired by Veolia/Transdev two years ago. “The union has benefitted from Workers World. One of the founders is a Workers World member. I look forward to going to the conference every year and we always have a great time. We learn a lot.” This will be the third year in a row that François has attended and the third that the union has sent a bus. Last year, Team Solidarity gave a detailed update to the party, appealing for solidarity in their struggle. The drivers joined conference participants in a march on Veolia’s Manhattan offices to “Say No to Veolia’s union busting” and to demand the immediate reinstatement of the fired union leaders! “We met with activist leaders from cities across the country as well as international guests, including an impressive delegation from revolutionary Cuba,” said vice president and fired union leader Steve Kirschbaum. “The conference provided a unique opportunity to learn, discuss, deliberate and formulate strategy for fighting back against the ravages of capitalism and the union-busting, racism, sexism, LGBTQ oppression, discrimination against people with disabilities, immigrants and youth and other evils that it breeds.” Much has developed in the union’s ongoing struggle since last year’s conference. Local 8751 has successfully beat back the Veolia/Transdev/Boston Police, anti-union, felony frame-up of Vice President Kirschbaum with a militant worker/community defense. Last April, Team Solidarity, led by the four fired leaders, swept every position in the union’s Executive Board election in a historic landslide victory. The new board has brought rank-and-file activist unionism into every bus yard every day of the year. The union continues to demand a just contract with no concessions, the reinstatement of the illegally fired leaders and an end to the racist austerity cutbacks to public education. “This past year, the fighting rank and file of USW 8751 have been visited by countless ‘Solidarity Boots on the Ground’ contingents from Workers World branches throughout the country, standing shoulder to shoulder with us in the finest tradition of union solidarity, marching in pickets, rallies, packing the courtroom and the 101 organizational tasks required to successfully carry out the struggle,” the team stated in a leaflet about the bus trip. “We will be forever indebted and grateful for this exemplary solidarity in action! We know that we will win! Our contingent this year will be looking forward to meeting with old friends and comrades in battle as well as meeting new ones and preparing the continuing struggle to build a better world — a Workers World!”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Access to independent online discussion forum blocked

first_img Reporters Without Borders condemns the blocking of the online discussion forum UAE Hewar (http://uaehewar.net/), which has been inaccessible in the United Arab Emirates since 7 February. Some of the contributors to the site think the authorities are blocking it in order to discover the identity of the site’s owners, who call themselves “Emirati intellectuals.”One of the site’s pages was blocked in November because of an article about religion (see http://www.emarati.katib.org/node/109), but this is the first time the entire site has been blocked. Hosted in the United States, it can still be accessed outside the UAE.“This is an act of censorship aimed at suppressing the most independent voices in the Emirates,” Reporters Without Borders said, calling for the site to be unblocked at once. “The authorities are displaying an inability to tolerate the Internet’s use as an open space for discussion.”Attempts to connect within the UAE produce a “network error” message. Responding belatedly to queries from site members, the Telecom Regulatory Authority evasively referred them to telephone operators Etisalat and Du. The US company that hosts the site, Host Rocket, confirmed to Reporters Without Borders that its inaccessibility in the UAE is not due to any technical problem.UAE Hewar is very popular. The subjects debated on the forum include such human rights issues as freedom of opinion and expression, civil and political rights, the independence of the judicial system and racial discrimination – issues not traditionally discussed in the Emirati media. United Arab EmiratesMiddle East – North Africa February 24, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Access to independent online discussion forum blocked Organisation RSF_en News April 28, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts United Arab EmiratesMiddle East – North Africa NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs saycenter_img June 8, 2021 Find out more to go further News December 23, 2020 Find out more RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance RSF joins other NGOs in amicus brief in WhatsApp suit against NSO Group News Follow the news on United Arab Emirates Newslast_img read more

OPD: Woman tried to stab step-mother

first_img Previous articleOPD: Intoxicated man tried to bribe copNext articleMan charged with strangling wife admin WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Local NewsCrime Pinterest By admin – June 13, 2018 Pinterest Facebook OPD: Woman tried to stab step-mother Keiante Keeling A 19-year-old woman was charged by police Saturday after reportedly trying to stab her step-mother with a kitchen knife.Officers were called about a domestic disturbance around 7:50 p.m. Saturday to Arbor Oaks Apartments, 1000 E. Monahans St., where they made contact with the 36-year-old victim and her step-daughter, Keiante Keeling.An Odessa Police Department news release stated that after a disturbance between the two, Keeling reportedly grabbed a kitchen knife and ran toward her step-mother, swinging the knife and attempting to stab her.The victim reportedly grabbed the knife from Keeling and sustained no injuries, the release detailed.Police charged Keeling with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony.Jail records show Keeling was taken to the Ector County Detention Center Sunday and has a $25,000 bond. WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

Cases Against MPs, MLAs: Punjab and Haryana High Court Seeks Details Of Cases By April 30

first_imgNews UpdatesCases Against MPs, MLAs: Punjab and Haryana High Court Seeks Details Of Cases By April 30 Sparsh Upadhyay21 April 2021 9:38 PMShare This – xThe Punjab and Haryana High Court on Tuesday (20th April) gave a 10-day deadline to the Centre, State of Punjab, and Punjab Police to file their affidavits furnishing details of cases involving sitting and erstwhile parliamentarians and legislators of Punjab. The Bench of Justice Rajan Gupta and Justice Karamjit Singh took into account the submission made by the Additional Solicitor-General of India that he required another one weeks’ time to respond to the court’s previous order dated February 25. Thus, the Court directed, “He shall be at liberty to file an affidavit on or before the next date of hearing”. Further, the Bench also directed Punjab’s Additional Advocate General and State’s Inspector-General of Police, Crime, Arun Pal Singh, to file an affidavit in the matter and the case was posted for further hearing on April 30. It may be noted that on the previous day of the hearing, the division had taken cognizance of cases pending against MPs, MLAs and had directed all the District and Sessions Judges to send information regarding pending cases against MLAs, MPs in CWP No. (PIL)-29-2021 titled Court on its own motion versus State of Punjab. The Court’s has been clear in its intent to fast-track cases involving sitting and erstwhile MPs and legislators of Punjab, Haryana and Chandigarh by not only seeking details of pending matters, but also issuing directions for their expeditious disposal. It may be noted that a writ petition was filed before the Supreme Court to reduce the criminalization of politics and to rationalize criminal prosecution of elected representatives. The petitioner had urged the Supreme Court to issue direction to provide adequate infrastructure to set up Special Courts to decide criminal cases related to people representatives. The petitioner had also requested for issuance of directions for implementation of “Important Electoral Reforms” proposed by Election Commission, law commission, and national commission to review the working of the constitution and to set minimum qualification and maximum age limit for such people representatives. When the matter came up for hearing before the Supreme Court, the Court had directed all the High Courts to furnish the requisite information regarding all the cases (criminal) pending against legislators (sitting or former). Accordingly, the Division Bench of Punjab and Haryana High Court passed the following order: “In the spirit of the order passed by Hon’ble Supreme court titled as Ashwani Kumar Upadhyay Vs. Union of India & Anr. (supra), an Officer of the rank of Inspector General of Police shall be present on the next date of hearing to furnish the requisite information of all the cases pending against the MPs/MLAs (sitting or erstwhile) in the States of Punjab, Haryana & U.T. Chandigarh. A similar direction is issued to District Judges of Punjab, Haryana & U.T. Chandigarh to furnish details of such cases and to ensure their speedy disposal thereof. They shall also send a report regarding the stage of such trials At this stage, Mr. Khosla, learned amicus curiae points out that information may also be required from the Union of India, Central Bureau of Investigation, E.D. and other Central Investigating Agencies as the operative part of the order specifically mentions that trial of all the criminal cases instituted by the State(s) have to be monitored. As we have requested information from all the Sessions Judges in the three States, we expect that information as suggested by Mr. Khosla would also be furnished. Registry to examine the possibility of listing the matter on a date this court is sitting for a physical hearing. Learned counsel shall be notified of such date in advance.” The bench had also sought information regarding cases pending with CBI, the Enforcement Directorate, and other Central Agencies. The registry has also been directed to submit the list of pending cases and see the possibility of listing the matter for physical hearing. Click here to read/download the orderTagsCriminal Cases Against MP And MLAs Cases Against MP/MLA Cases Against MLA/MPs #Criminal Cases Against MPs/MLAs Punjab and Haryana High Court Next Storylast_img read more